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From this link I fount the following representation of Rosetta's orbit relative to 67P: enter image description here

A video from ESA depicts a similar orbit.

My questions are:

  • is that really the relative orbit?

If yes:

  • why is it triangular initially? does this bring some specific benefits?
  • doesn't that shape costs a ludicrous amount of propellant? or in the Sun-centered fixed frame of reference the actual orbit undergoes much smaller changes of direction than it would appear from the images shown? (and thus the total $\Delta V$ required is not as big)
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This was one of the questions just now during the Rosetta press briefing. This video was shown during the presentation. The triangular trajectory are hyperbolic orbits with respect to the comet and they'll (also, among other tasks also mentioned in the image you're attaching) serve to establish its mass. In essence scientists will be looking at how the comet's gravity changes these "straight" legs of the triangular Rosetta's quasi-orbit around comet 67P and estimate its density / mass more precisely.

The trajectory changing maneuvers aren't all that costly to the Rosetta spacecraft, and it was mentioned (during the briefing) that we're talking of delta-v of only a few meters per second during each of these maneuvers. So in a sense, since the comet's own gravity isn't all that great and the probe was already successfully injected into comet's own heliocentric orbit, they're not expensive to Rosetta's own propellants and would be more alike to satellite station-keeping maneuvers, like say the ones that satellites in halo or Lissajous orbits at Lagrange points would be performing, also on a fairly regular basis.

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thanks. It would be nice to understand how such triangular orbit is better than a circular one to identify the density distribution (satellites that have being doing it for Earth have followed pretty much circular LEOs, afaik) –  Federico Aug 6 at 13:33
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@Federico I do apologize for duplication, I just wanted to confirm that that is indeed Rosetta's planned trajectory even now when its bi-lobe nature was established. Why triangular? Well the clue is in the "hyperbolic" part, i.e. the probe has still some hyperbolic excess velocity w.r.t. the comet that it'll slowly reduce to enter more stable obit. Of course, since the comet's mass distribution isn't yet precisely established, trying to enter such orbit would just as well require constant corrections. Long triangular legs give scientists longer time to observe effects of comet's gravity on it. –  TildalWave Aug 6 at 13:39
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@Federico: Rosetta is currently going faster than orbital velocity. To go into a circular trajectory, it would have to thrust continuously -- which probably wouldn't be any more expensive than its current triangular trajectory, but spending more time in free fall lets it make more accurate measurements. (I think.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 7 at 2:29

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