4 replaced http://space.stackexchange.com/ with https://space.stackexchange.com/
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Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed (nearly 8 km/s, or about an order of magnitude faster than most bullets; slower, higher orbits require even more energy). This acceleration takes the vast majority of the rocket's fuel, at least 90%90%.

Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed (nearly 8 km/s, or about an order of magnitude faster than most bullets; slower, higher orbits require even more energy). This acceleration takes the vast majority of the rocket's fuel, at least 90%.

Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed (nearly 8 km/s, or about an order of magnitude faster than most bullets; slower, higher orbits require even more energy). This acceleration takes the vast majority of the rocket's fuel, at least 90%.

3 Added more speed details and another reference
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Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed (nearly 8 km/s, or about an order of magnitude faster than most bullets; slower, higher orbits require even more energy). This acceleration takes the vast majority of the rocket's fuel, at least 90%.

Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed. This acceleration takes the vast majority of the rocket's fuel, at least 90%.

Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed (nearly 8 km/s, or about an order of magnitude faster than most bullets; slower, higher orbits require even more energy). This acceleration takes the vast majority of the rocket's fuel, at least 90%.

2 Clarifying just how important orbital speed is
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Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed. This acceleration takes the vast majority of the rocket's fuel, at least 90%.

Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed.

Drag is highest at low altitudes, and drag can cause problems with heating, pressure strain on various parts, and of course slowing acceleration. So the rocket starts by climbing above most of that, then converting most of its upward velocity into sideways and accelerating a whole lot more to get up to orbital speed. This acceleration takes the vast majority of the rocket's fuel, at least 90%.

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