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As I understand isit, Liquid Fuelled Rocketsliquid-fueled rockets typically burn some amount of their fuel in a separate low-pressure combustion chamber, and then use the combustion products produced to drive the turbo-pumpturbopump. High efficiency-efficiency engines then pump this exhaust into the rocketsrocket's combustion chamber to ensure complete combustion and get more efficiency from the engine.

Would it be feasible to instead use some of the high-pressure gas from the rockets main combustion chamber to drive the turbopump, having passed it through a nozzle to reduce the pressure?

As I understand is, Liquid Fuelled Rockets typically burn some amount of their fuel in a separate low-pressure combustion chamber, and then use the combustion products produced to drive the turbo-pump. High efficiency engines then pump this exhaust into the rockets combustion chamber to ensure complete combustion and get more efficiency from the engine.

Would it be feasible to instead use some of the high-pressure gas from the rockets main combustion chamber to drive the turbopump, having passed it through a nozzle to reduce the pressure?

As I understand it, liquid-fueled rockets typically burn some amount of their fuel in a separate low-pressure combustion chamber, and then use the combustion products produced to drive the turbopump. High-efficiency engines then pump this exhaust into the rocket's combustion chamber to ensure complete combustion and get more efficiency from the engine.

Would it be feasible to instead use some of the high-pressure gas from the rockets main combustion chamber to drive the turbopump, having passed it through a nozzle to reduce the pressure?

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Why don't rockets drive the turbopump from the combustion chamber?

As I understand is, Liquid Fuelled Rockets typically burn some amount of their fuel in a separate low-pressure combustion chamber, and then use the combustion products produced to drive the turbo-pump. High efficiency engines then pump this exhaust into the rockets combustion chamber to ensure complete combustion and get more efficiency from the engine.

Would it be feasible to instead use some of the high-pressure gas from the rockets main combustion chamber to drive the turbopump, having passed it through a nozzle to reduce the pressure?