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No, inside a single solar system this is not possible. The larger a circular orbit the longer it will take to complete.

Two catches:

If we have two different solar systems, one with a massive sun (and thus higher speeds needed for the same orbit) and you compare that to a system with a lighter sun then you will see different speeds. But then we are comparing two orbits around two different suns.

Secondly, I have no idea how this will work for non-cicular orbits. Esp.Especially if you take one circular orbit and one highly elepticalelliptical one. Also, how do you declare which is the 'outer planet' if the elipsellipse takes it both inside and outside the other planets orbit?

No, inside a single solar system this is not possible. The larger a circular orbit the longer it will take to complete.

Two catches:

If we have two different solar systems, one with a massive sun (and thus higher speeds needed for the same orbit) and you compare that to a system with a lighter sun then you will see different speeds. But then we are comparing two orbits around two different suns.

Secondly, I have no idea how this will work for non-cicular orbits. Esp. if you take one circular orbit and one highly eleptical one. Also, how do you declare which is the 'outer planet' if the elips takes it both inside and outside the other planets orbit?

No, inside a single solar system this is not possible. The larger a circular orbit the longer it will take to complete.

Two catches:

If we have two different solar systems, one with a massive sun (and thus higher speeds needed for the same orbit) and you compare that to a system with a lighter sun then you will see different speeds. But then we are comparing two orbits around two different suns.

Secondly, I have no idea how this will work for non-cicular orbits. Especially if you take one circular orbit and one highly elliptical one. Also, how do you declare which is the 'outer planet' if the ellipse takes it both inside and outside the other planets orbit?

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source | link

No, inside a single solar system this is not possible. The larger a circular orbit the longer it will take to complete.

Two catches:

If we have two different solar systems, one with a massive sun (and thus higher speeds needed for the same orbit) and you compare that to a system with a lighter sun then you will see different speeds. But then we are comparing two orbits around two different suns.

Secondly, I have no idea how this will work for non-cicular orbits. Esp. if you take one circular orbit and one highly eleptical one. Also, how do you declare which is the 'outer planet' if the elips takes it both inside and outside the other planets orbit?