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This is actually pretty common in rocket launch profile design. For the Ariane rocket, we covered it in http://space.stackexchange.com/q/13749/25What is the reason for the Ariane 5 launcher with Intelsat 29e losing altitude?, but the same principal applies in general. When you have a low thrust high ISP upper stage, it is common for it to thrust more horizontally at a certain point than vertically, which might cause the altitude to go down somewhat. The speed eventually will be such that the altitude begins to rise, as the curvature of the Earth drops off more.

This is actually pretty common in rocket launch profile design. For the Ariane rocket, we covered it in http://space.stackexchange.com/q/13749/25, but the same principal applies in general. When you have a low thrust high ISP upper stage, it is common for it to thrust more horizontally at a certain point than vertically, which might cause the altitude to go down somewhat. The speed eventually will be such that the altitude begins to rise, as the curvature of the Earth drops off more.

This is actually pretty common in rocket launch profile design. For the Ariane rocket, we covered it in What is the reason for the Ariane 5 launcher with Intelsat 29e losing altitude?, but the same principal applies in general. When you have a low thrust high ISP upper stage, it is common for it to thrust more horizontally at a certain point than vertically, which might cause the altitude to go down somewhat. The speed eventually will be such that the altitude begins to rise, as the curvature of the Earth drops off more.

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This is actually pretty common in rocket launch profile design. For the Ariane rocket, we covered it in http://space.stackexchange.com/q/13749/25, but the same principal applies in general. When you have a low thrust high ISP upper stage, it is common for it to thrust more horizontally at a certain point than vertically, which might cause the altitude to go down somewhat. The speed eventually will be such that the altitude begins to rise, as the curvature of the Earth drops off more.

This is actually pretty common in rocket design. For the Ariane rocket, we covered it in http://space.stackexchange.com/q/13749/25, but the same principal applies in general. When you have a low thrust high ISP upper stage, it is common for it to thrust more horizontally at a certain point than vertically, which might cause the altitude to go down somewhat. The speed eventually will be such that the altitude begins to rise, as the curvature of the Earth drops off more.

This is actually pretty common in rocket launch profile design. For the Ariane rocket, we covered it in http://space.stackexchange.com/q/13749/25, but the same principal applies in general. When you have a low thrust high ISP upper stage, it is common for it to thrust more horizontally at a certain point than vertically, which might cause the altitude to go down somewhat. The speed eventually will be such that the altitude begins to rise, as the curvature of the Earth drops off more.

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This is actually pretty common in rocket design. For the Ariane rocket, we covered it in http://space.stackexchange.com/q/13749/25, but the same principal applies in general. When you have a low thrust high ISP upper stage, it is common for it to thrust more horizontally at a certain point than vertically, which might cause the altitude to go down somewhat. The speed eventually will be such that the altitude begins to rise, as the curvature of the Earth drops off more.