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If launching into a low-inclination orbit, you want to launch due east from the lowest latitude possible. This gives you the advantage of starting the flight with the speed of the Earth's rotation at your launch latitude; that is "free" speed that the rocket does not need to impart. Furthermore, you want to avoid overflying land masses so malfunctioning rockets to do not land on people's heads, which can have negative budget implications. When launching into higher inclination orbits you adjust your launch azimuth accordingly. Your launch azimuth determines your ground track and thus which land masses you might hit with rocket debris. Typically the launch azimuth for an orbital flight is going to be between due North and due South, on the right-hand side of the compass (0 to +180 deg). Launching to the east from the Texas coast would result in overlying lots of land mass (US, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, S.America). Launching from Florida mitigates this for easterly launches. Polar orbit launches are commonly done from Vandenberg AFB in CA, flying south over the Pacific. High-inclination and polar launches are conducted from Wallops VA. Johnson Space Center's Houston location is a result of politics (President Johnson was from Texas). [I am a former Space Shuttle Mission Control Flight Dynamics Officer.]

If launching into a low-inclination orbit, you want to launch due east from the lowest latitude possible. This gives you the advantage of starting the flight with the speed of the Earth's rotation at your launch latitude; that is "free" speed that the rocket does not need to impart. Furthermore, you want to avoid overflying land masses so malfunctioning rockets to do not land on people's heads, which can have negative budget implications. When launching into higher inclination orbits you adjust your launch azimuth accordingly. Your launch azimuth determines your ground track and thus which land masses you might hit with rocket debris. Typically the launch azimuth for an orbital flight is going to be between due North and due South, on the right-hand side of the compass (0 to +180 deg). Launching to the east from the Texas coast would result in overlying lots of land mass (US, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, S.America). Launching from Florida mitigates this for easterly launches. Polar orbit launches are commonly done from Vandenberg AFB in CA, flying south over the Pacific. High-inclination and polar launches are conducted from Wallops VA. Johnson Space Center's Houston location is a result of politics (President Johnson was from Texas). [I am a former Space Shuttle Mission Control Flight Dynamics Officer.]

If launching into a low-inclination orbit, you want to launch due east from the lowest latitude possible. This gives you the advantage of starting the flight with the speed of the Earth's rotation at your launch latitude; that is "free" speed that the rocket does not need to impart. Furthermore, you want to avoid overflying land masses so malfunctioning rockets to do not land on people's heads, which can have negative budget implications. When launching into higher inclination orbits you adjust your launch azimuth accordingly. Your launch azimuth determines your ground track and thus which land masses you might hit with rocket debris. Typically the launch azimuth for an orbital flight is going to be between due North and due South, on the right-hand side of the compass (0 to +180 deg). Launching to the east from the Texas coast would result in overlying lots of land mass (US, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, S.America). Launching from Florida mitigates this for easterly launches. Polar orbit launches are commonly done from Vandenberg AFB in CA, flying south over the Pacific. High-inclination and polar launches are conducted from Wallops VA. Johnson Space Center's Houston location is a result of politics (President Johnson was from Texas).

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If launching into a low-inclination orbit, you want to launch due east from the lowest latitude possible. This gives you the advantage of starting the flight with the speed of the Earth's rotation at your launch latitude; that is "free" speed that the rocket does not need to impart. Furthermore, you want to avoid overflying land masses so malfunctioning rockets to do not land on people's heads, which can have negative budget implications. When launching into higher inclination orbits you adjust your launch azimuth accordingly. Your launch azimuth determines your ground track and thus which land masses you might hit with rocket debris. Typically the launch azimuth for an orbital flight is going to be between due North and due South, on the right-hand side of the compass (0 to +180 deg). Launching to the east from the Texas coast would result in overlying lots of land mass (US, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, S.America). Launching from Florida mitigates this for easterly launches. Polar orbit launches are commonly done from Vandenberg AFB in CA, flying south over the Pacific. High-inclination and polar launches are conducted from Wallops VA. Johnson Space Center's Houston location is a result of politics (President Johnson was from Texas). [I am a former Space Shuttle Mission Control Flight Dynamics Officer.]