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That seems a bit counter-intuitive, because in an orbit above the belt, the satellite would eventually loselose gain velocity, so its orbit would intersect the orbital plane of the geostationary satellites possibly creating a collision hazard. To be re-orbited, a satellite has to have functional attitude control [Wikipedia], which would also allow to lower increase the velocity to decrease the altitude instead. So, why isn't the so-called graveyard orbit below the geostationary altitude?

That seems a bit counter-intuitive, because in an orbit above the belt, the satellite would eventually lose velocity, so its orbit would intersect the orbital plane of the geostationary satellites possibly creating a collision hazard. To be re-orbited, a satellite has to have functional attitude control [Wikipedia], which would also allow to lower increase the velocity to decrease the altitude instead. So, why isn't the so-called graveyard orbit below the geostationary altitude?

That seems a bit counter-intuitive, because in an orbit above the belt, the satellite would eventually lose gain velocity, so its orbit would intersect the orbital plane of the geostationary satellites possibly creating a collision hazard. To be re-orbited, a satellite has to have functional attitude control [Wikipedia], which would also allow to lower increase the velocity to decrease the altitude instead. So, why isn't the so-called graveyard orbit below the geostationary altitude?

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That seems a bit counter-intuitive, because in an orbit above the belt, the satellite would eventually lose velocity, so its orbit would intersect the orbital plane of the geostationary satellites possibly creating a collision hazard. To be re-orbited, a satellite has to have functional attitude control [Wikipedia], which would also allow to lowerlower increase the velocity to decrease the altitude instead. So, why isn't the so-called graveyard orbit below the geostationary altitude?

That seems a bit counter-intuitive, because in an orbit above the belt, the satellite would eventually lose velocity, so its orbit would intersect the orbital plane of the geostationary satellites possibly creating a collision hazard. To be re-orbited, a satellite has to have functional attitude control [Wikipedia], which would also allow to lower the velocity to decrease the altitude instead. So, why isn't the so-called graveyard orbit below the geostationary altitude?

That seems a bit counter-intuitive, because in an orbit above the belt, the satellite would eventually lose velocity, so its orbit would intersect the orbital plane of the geostationary satellites possibly creating a collision hazard. To be re-orbited, a satellite has to have functional attitude control [Wikipedia], which would also allow to lower increase the velocity to decrease the altitude instead. So, why isn't the so-called graveyard orbit below the geostationary altitude?

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Why are obsolete geostationary satellites re-orbited above the geostationary belt?

That seems a bit counter-intuitive, because in an orbit above the belt, the satellite would eventually lose velocity, so its orbit would intersect the orbital plane of the geostationary satellites possibly creating a collision hazard. To be re-orbited, a satellite has to have functional attitude control [Wikipedia], which would also allow to lower the velocity to decrease the altitude instead. So, why isn't the so-called graveyard orbit below the geostationary altitude?