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The answer to Do we still have all the equipment to go back to the moon? is an unambiguous "no". Most of the equipment went to museums or got scrapped. But do we still have all the know-how?

Say, a political miracle happens, and the Congress decides "Apollo 18 should happen ASAP" and it should be an exact duplicate of Apollo 17. No R&D work is expected, just rebuilding the Apollo 17 from scratch. Rebuild/restart all the manufacturing, reopen all the closed facilities, all the engineering work to get it all up and running basing on existing documentation, training based on old procedures, astronauts training on equipment rebuilt from old blueprints, zero new research. If contractors / 3rd party manufacturers no longer produce something, they'll be paid to reopen the production, rebuilding production facilities and retraining the crew if needed, but not "reinvent" the technology if it was lost.

Do we have all the data to do this, or was some of it lost, say, passed as word-onof-mouth and forgotten, or destroyed along with closure of some facilities?

As for the duplicate suggestion, the gist of difference between the questions is: the Saturn one asks "Why don't we", with answer "We don't want to - It's not practical." Mine asks "But can we, assuming we'd (somehow) want to and had the budget?"

The answer to Do we still have all the equipment to go back to the moon? is an unambiguous "no". Most of the equipment went to museums or got scrapped. But do we still have all the know-how?

Say, a political miracle happens, and the Congress decides "Apollo 18 should happen ASAP" and it should be an exact duplicate of Apollo 17. No R&D work is expected, just rebuilding the Apollo 17 from scratch. Rebuild/restart all the manufacturing, reopen all the closed facilities, all the engineering work to get it all up and running basing on existing documentation, training based on old procedures, astronauts training on equipment rebuilt from old blueprints, zero new research. If contractors / 3rd party manufacturers no longer produce something, they'll be paid to reopen the production, rebuilding production facilities and retraining the crew if needed, but not "reinvent" the technology if it was lost.

Do we have all the data to do this, or was some of it lost, say, passed as word-on-mouth and forgotten, or destroyed along with closure of some facilities?

As for the duplicate suggestion, the gist of difference between the questions is: the Saturn one asks "Why don't we", with answer "We don't want to - It's not practical." Mine asks "But can we, assuming we'd (somehow) want to and had the budget?"

The answer to Do we still have all the equipment to go back to the moon? is an unambiguous "no". Most of the equipment went to museums or got scrapped. But do we still have all the know-how?

Say, a political miracle happens, and the Congress decides "Apollo 18 should happen ASAP" and it should be an exact duplicate of Apollo 17. No R&D work is expected, just rebuilding the Apollo 17 from scratch. Rebuild/restart all the manufacturing, reopen all the closed facilities, all the engineering work to get it all up and running basing on existing documentation, training based on old procedures, astronauts training on equipment rebuilt from old blueprints, zero new research. If contractors / 3rd party manufacturers no longer produce something, they'll be paid to reopen the production, rebuilding production facilities and retraining the crew if needed, but not "reinvent" the technology if it was lost.

Do we have all the data to do this, or was some of it lost, say, passed as word-of-mouth and forgotten, or destroyed along with closure of some facilities?

As for the duplicate suggestion, the gist of difference between the questions is: the Saturn one asks "Why don't we", with answer "We don't want to - It's not practical." Mine asks "But can we, assuming we'd (somehow) want to and had the budget?"

    Post Closed as "duplicate" by Russell Borogove, Nathan Tuggy, Fred, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩, Hohmannfan of
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The answer to Do we still have all the equipment to go back to the moon? is an unambiguous "no". Most of the equipment went to museums or got scrapped. But do we still have all the know-how?

Say, a political miracle happens, and the Congress decides "Apollo 18 should happen ASAP" and it should be an exact duplicate of Apollo 17. No R&D work is expected, just rebuilding the Apollo 17 from scratch. Rebuild/restart all the manufacturing, reopen all the closed facilities, all the engineering work to get it all up and running basing on existing documentation, training based on old procedures, astronauts training on equipment rebuilt from old blueprints, zero new research. If contractors / 3rd party manufacturers no longer produce something, they'll be paid to reopen the production, rebuilding production facilities and retraining the crew if needed, but not "reinvent" the technology if it was lost.

Do we have all the data to do this, or was some of it lost, say, passed as word-on-mouth and forgotten, or destroyed along with closure of some facilities?

As for the duplicate suggestion, the gist of difference between the questions is: the Saturn one asks "Why don't we", with answer "We don't want to - It's not practical." Mine asks "But can we, assuming we'd (somehow) want to and had the budget?"

The answer to Do we still have all the equipment to go back to the moon? is an unambiguous "no". Most of the equipment went to museums or got scrapped. But do we still have all the know-how?

Say, a political miracle happens, and the Congress decides "Apollo 18 should happen ASAP" and it should be an exact duplicate of Apollo 17. No R&D work is expected, just rebuilding the Apollo 17 from scratch. Rebuild/restart all the manufacturing, reopen all the closed facilities, all the engineering work to get it all up and running basing on existing documentation, training based on old procedures, astronauts training on equipment rebuilt from old blueprints, zero new research. If contractors / 3rd party manufacturers no longer produce something, they'll be paid to reopen the production, rebuilding production facilities and retraining the crew if needed, but not "reinvent" the technology if it was lost.

Do we have all the data to do this, or was some of it lost, say, passed as word-on-mouth and forgotten, or destroyed along with closure of some facilities?

The answer to Do we still have all the equipment to go back to the moon? is an unambiguous "no". Most of the equipment went to museums or got scrapped. But do we still have all the know-how?

Say, a political miracle happens, and the Congress decides "Apollo 18 should happen ASAP" and it should be an exact duplicate of Apollo 17. No R&D work is expected, just rebuilding the Apollo 17 from scratch. Rebuild/restart all the manufacturing, reopen all the closed facilities, all the engineering work to get it all up and running basing on existing documentation, training based on old procedures, astronauts training on equipment rebuilt from old blueprints, zero new research. If contractors / 3rd party manufacturers no longer produce something, they'll be paid to reopen the production, rebuilding production facilities and retraining the crew if needed, but not "reinvent" the technology if it was lost.

Do we have all the data to do this, or was some of it lost, say, passed as word-on-mouth and forgotten, or destroyed along with closure of some facilities?

As for the duplicate suggestion, the gist of difference between the questions is: the Saturn one asks "Why don't we", with answer "We don't want to - It's not practical." Mine asks "But can we, assuming we'd (somehow) want to and had the budget?"

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Do we still have all the blueprints to go to the Moon?

The answer to Do we still have all the equipment to go back to the moon? is an unambiguous "no". Most of the equipment went to museums or got scrapped. But do we still have all the know-how?

Say, a political miracle happens, and the Congress decides "Apollo 18 should happen ASAP" and it should be an exact duplicate of Apollo 17. No R&D work is expected, just rebuilding the Apollo 17 from scratch. Rebuild/restart all the manufacturing, reopen all the closed facilities, all the engineering work to get it all up and running basing on existing documentation, training based on old procedures, astronauts training on equipment rebuilt from old blueprints, zero new research. If contractors / 3rd party manufacturers no longer produce something, they'll be paid to reopen the production, rebuilding production facilities and retraining the crew if needed, but not "reinvent" the technology if it was lost.

Do we have all the data to do this, or was some of it lost, say, passed as word-on-mouth and forgotten, or destroyed along with closure of some facilities?