3 replaced http://space.stackexchange.com/ with https://space.stackexchange.com/
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Have a look at my answer to a similar question: Have any countries laid claim to territory in space?Have any countries laid claim to territory in space?

It is most likely that property claims will eventually cause trouble. Today, the Moon is just too far away for causing any trouble, so it is save to ignore it.

Antarctica is a useful example for this philosophy. Although there are tons of territorial claims there and although Argentina for instance even keeps a military presences manned at all time, disputes have never resulted in military action yet. Instead, Antarctica became protected under the United Nation's Antarctica treaty. The fun part is, that it is just technologically complicated to make use of resources there, so nobody defended claims. On the contrary, the treaty explicitly becomes "open for review" in the 2040s - once technology has seen a significant improvement. Guess, what will happen next ...

Have a look at my answer to a similar question: Have any countries laid claim to territory in space?

It is most likely that property claims will eventually cause trouble. Today, the Moon is just too far away for causing any trouble, so it is save to ignore it.

Antarctica is a useful example for this philosophy. Although there are tons of territorial claims there and although Argentina for instance even keeps a military presences manned at all time, disputes have never resulted in military action yet. Instead, Antarctica became protected under the United Nation's Antarctica treaty. The fun part is, that it is just technologically complicated to make use of resources there, so nobody defended claims. On the contrary, the treaty explicitly becomes "open for review" in the 2040s - once technology has seen a significant improvement. Guess, what will happen next ...

Have a look at my answer to a similar question: Have any countries laid claim to territory in space?

It is most likely that property claims will eventually cause trouble. Today, the Moon is just too far away for causing any trouble, so it is save to ignore it.

Antarctica is a useful example for this philosophy. Although there are tons of territorial claims there and although Argentina for instance even keeps a military presences manned at all time, disputes have never resulted in military action yet. Instead, Antarctica became protected under the United Nation's Antarctica treaty. The fun part is, that it is just technologically complicated to make use of resources there, so nobody defended claims. On the contrary, the treaty explicitly becomes "open for review" in the 2040s - once technology has seen a significant improvement. Guess, what will happen next ...

2 Bad typo ...
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Have a look at my answer to a similar question: Have any countries laid claim to territory in space?

It is most likely that property claims will eventually cause trouble. Today, the Moon justis just too far away for causing any trouble, so it is save to ignore it.

Antarctica is a useful example for this philosophy. Although there are tons of territorial claims there and although Argentina for instance even keeps a military presences manned at all time, disputes have never resulted in military action yet. Instead, Antarctica became protected under the United Nation's Antarctica treaty. The fun part is, that it is just technologically complicated to make use of resources there, so nobody defended claims. On the contrary, the treaty explicitly becomes "open for review" in the 2040s - once technology has seen a significant improvement. Guess, what will happen next ...

Have a look at my answer to a similar question: Have any countries laid claim to territory in space?

It is most likely that property claims will eventually cause trouble. Today, the Moon just just too far away for causing any trouble, so it is save to ignore it.

Antarctica is a useful example for this philosophy. Although there are tons of territorial claims there and although Argentina for instance even keeps a military presences manned at all time, disputes have never resulted in military action yet. Instead, Antarctica became protected under the United Nation's Antarctica treaty. The fun part is, that it is just technologically complicated to make use of resources there, so nobody defended claims. On the contrary, the treaty explicitly becomes "open for review" in the 2040s - once technology has seen a significant improvement. Guess, what will happen next ...

Have a look at my answer to a similar question: Have any countries laid claim to territory in space?

It is most likely that property claims will eventually cause trouble. Today, the Moon is just too far away for causing any trouble, so it is save to ignore it.

Antarctica is a useful example for this philosophy. Although there are tons of territorial claims there and although Argentina for instance even keeps a military presences manned at all time, disputes have never resulted in military action yet. Instead, Antarctica became protected under the United Nation's Antarctica treaty. The fun part is, that it is just technologically complicated to make use of resources there, so nobody defended claims. On the contrary, the treaty explicitly becomes "open for review" in the 2040s - once technology has seen a significant improvement. Guess, what will happen next ...

1
source | link

Have a look at my answer to a similar question: Have any countries laid claim to territory in space?

It is most likely that property claims will eventually cause trouble. Today, the Moon just just too far away for causing any trouble, so it is save to ignore it.

Antarctica is a useful example for this philosophy. Although there are tons of territorial claims there and although Argentina for instance even keeps a military presences manned at all time, disputes have never resulted in military action yet. Instead, Antarctica became protected under the United Nation's Antarctica treaty. The fun part is, that it is just technologically complicated to make use of resources there, so nobody defended claims. On the contrary, the treaty explicitly becomes "open for review" in the 2040s - once technology has seen a significant improvement. Guess, what will happen next ...