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2 emphasize speed change is slowing down for the current altitude
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Actually, the ISS would have to slow down a lotslow down by an order of magnitude in order to take 24 hours to orbit the Earth at its current altitudeat its current altitude where it completes an orbit every 1.5 hours - 16 times a day - with an orbital velocity of 4.76 mi/sec. Thus, to keep it "geosynchronous" at its current altitude, you would have to slow it to 1071 mph (4.76 mi/sec / 16 * 3600 - current speed divided by orbits per day times seconds per hour). At that speed, it wouldn't be in orbit any more, so you'd have to be expending a LOT of energy as upward thrust to keep it from falling straight down from the sky like a brick.

Actually, the ISS would have to slow down a lot in order to take 24 hours to orbit the Earth at its current altitude where it completes an orbit every 1.5 hours - 16 times a day - with an orbital velocity of 4.76 mi/sec. Thus, to keep it "geosynchronous" at its current altitude, you would have to slow it to 1071 mph (4.76 mi/sec / 16 * 3600 - current speed divided by orbits per day times seconds per hour). At that speed, it wouldn't be in orbit any more, so you'd have to be expending a LOT of energy as upward thrust to keep it from falling straight down from the sky like a brick.

Actually, the ISS would have to slow down by an order of magnitude in order to take 24 hours to orbit the Earth at its current altitude where it completes an orbit every 1.5 hours - 16 times a day - with an orbital velocity of 4.76 mi/sec. Thus, to keep it "geosynchronous" at its current altitude, you would have to slow it to 1071 mph (4.76 mi/sec / 16 * 3600 - current speed divided by orbits per day times seconds per hour). At that speed, it wouldn't be in orbit any more, so you'd have to be expending a LOT of energy as upward thrust to keep it from falling straight down from the sky like a brick.

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source | link

Actually, the ISS would have to slow down a lot in order to take 24 hours to orbit the Earth at its current altitude where it completes an orbit every 1.5 hours - 16 times a day - with an orbital velocity of 4.76 mi/sec. Thus, to keep it "geosynchronous" at its current altitude, you would have to slow it to 1071 mph (4.76 mi/sec / 16 * 3600 - current speed divided by orbits per day times seconds per hour). At that speed, it wouldn't be in orbit any more, so you'd have to be expending a LOT of energy as upward thrust to keep it from falling straight down from the sky like a brick.