2 added 68 characters in body
source | link

I'm not sure I can give you a specific amount of propllent, but I can give you a back of the envelope answer. Perhaps someone can add details from Shuttle Program documents.

The External Tank (ET) came off shortly after Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). After that, the Shuttle made one or more OMS burns depending on when the launch was made in the Program's history. These burns raised the orbit's perigee and circularized the orbit. The OMS pods had about 300 m/s delta-V available for the Orbiter alone. Making a rough estimate that half (?) of this (150 m/s) was used for orbital insertion and half was used for the deorbit burn, you would need to provide an additional 150 m/s of delta-V to the ET to get it into the shuttle's low orbit.

Keep in mind that an ET at this altitude would quickly re-enter due to the small but significant atmospheric drag. You would therefore have to either add additional delta-V to further raise the orbit or plan on reboosting the tank every 90-180 days like the ISS does.

Don't forget the rocket equation either. In addition to providing the additional delta-V to the ET, you have to provide additional delta-V for the fuel you use to provide this additional delta-V and so on, and so on, and....

I'm not sure I can give you a specific amount of propllent, but I can give you a back of the envelope answer. Perhaps someone can add details from Shuttle Program documents.

The External Tank (ET) came off shortly after Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). After that, the Shuttle made one or more OMS burns depending on when the launch was made in the Program's history. The OMS pods had about 300 m/s delta-V available for the Orbiter alone. Making a rough estimate that half (?) of this (150 m/s) was used for orbital insertion and half was used for the deorbit burn, you would need to provide an additional 150 m/s of delta-V to the ET to get it into the shuttle's low orbit.

Keep in mind that an ET at this altitude would quickly re-enter due to the small but significant atmospheric drag. You would therefore have to either add additional delta-V to further raise the orbit or plan on reboosting the tank every 90-180 days like the ISS does.

Don't forget the rocket equation either. In addition to providing the additional delta-V to the ET, you have to provide additional delta-V for the fuel you use to provide this additional delta-V and so on, and so on, and....

I'm not sure I can give you a specific amount of propllent, but I can give you a back of the envelope answer. Perhaps someone can add details from Shuttle Program documents.

The External Tank (ET) came off shortly after Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). After that, the Shuttle made one or more OMS burns depending on when the launch was made in the Program's history. These burns raised the orbit's perigee and circularized the orbit. The OMS pods had about 300 m/s delta-V available for the Orbiter alone. Making a rough estimate that half (?) of this (150 m/s) was used for orbital insertion and half was used for the deorbit burn, you would need to provide an additional 150 m/s of delta-V to the ET to get it into the shuttle's low orbit.

Keep in mind that an ET at this altitude would quickly re-enter due to the small but significant atmospheric drag. You would therefore have to either add additional delta-V to further raise the orbit or plan on reboosting the tank every 90-180 days like the ISS does.

Don't forget the rocket equation either. In addition to providing the additional delta-V to the ET, you have to provide additional delta-V for the fuel you use to provide this additional delta-V and so on, and so on, and....

1
source | link

I'm not sure I can give you a specific amount of propllent, but I can give you a back of the envelope answer. Perhaps someone can add details from Shuttle Program documents.

The External Tank (ET) came off shortly after Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). After that, the Shuttle made one or more OMS burns depending on when the launch was made in the Program's history. The OMS pods had about 300 m/s delta-V available for the Orbiter alone. Making a rough estimate that half (?) of this (150 m/s) was used for orbital insertion and half was used for the deorbit burn, you would need to provide an additional 150 m/s of delta-V to the ET to get it into the shuttle's low orbit.

Keep in mind that an ET at this altitude would quickly re-enter due to the small but significant atmospheric drag. You would therefore have to either add additional delta-V to further raise the orbit or plan on reboosting the tank every 90-180 days like the ISS does.

Don't forget the rocket equation either. In addition to providing the additional delta-V to the ET, you have to provide additional delta-V for the fuel you use to provide this additional delta-V and so on, and so on, and....