7 Far side of the Moon is already pointing away from Earth, its diurnal effects come from own rotation relative to the Sun
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The moon is another option. Without any atmosphere so a UV telescope (like those on the Chang'e landers) or IR telescope could work there without needing to be attached to a spacecraft. A radio telescope on the far side would also be shielded from artificial electromagnetic radiation from the Earth, as well as light and heat from the Sun during the two week long lunar night (or at least not much less than that due to thermal inertia and secondary radiation effects).

The moon is another option. Without any atmosphere so a UV telescope (like those on the Chang'e landers) or IR telescope could work there without needing to be attached to a spacecraft. A radio telescope on the far side would also be shielded from artificial electromagnetic radiation from the Earth, as well as light and heat from the Sun during the two week long lunar night (or at least not much less than that due to thermal inertia and secondary radiation effects).

The moon is another option. Without any atmosphere so a UV telescope (like those on the Chang'e landers) or IR telescope could work there without needing to be attached to a spacecraft. A radio telescope on the far side would also be shielded from artificial electromagnetic radiation from the Earth, as well as light and heat from the Sun during the two week long lunar night.

6 Far side of the Moon is already pointing away from Earth, its diurnal effects come from own rotation relative to the Sun
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The moon is another option. Without any atmosphere so a UV telescope (like those on the Chang'e landers) or IR telescope could work there without needing to be attached to a spacecraft. A radio telescope on the far side would also be shielded from artificial electromagnetic radiation from the Earth, as well as light and heat from the EarthSun during the two week long lunar night (or at least not much less than that due to thermal inertia and secondary radiation effects).

The moon is another option. Without any atmosphere so a UV telescope (like those on the Chang'e landers) or IR telescope could work there without needing to be attached to a spacecraft. A radio telescope on the far side would also be shielded from artificial electromagnetic radiation from the Earth, as well as light and heat from the Earth during the two week long lunar night.

The moon is another option. Without any atmosphere so a UV telescope (like those on the Chang'e landers) or IR telescope could work there without needing to be attached to a spacecraft. A radio telescope on the far side would also be shielded from artificial electromagnetic radiation from the Earth, as well as light and heat from the Sun during the two week long lunar night (or at least not much less than that due to thermal inertia and secondary radiation effects).

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In GEO, a space telescope could use a single stationary radio dish on Earth for its data transfer.

It wouldn't be a stationary antenna! The telescope would could in a single direction, but the Earth would be constantly moving with respect to the stars. You'd still have to constantly move the antenna while you were transmitting and observing at the same time, in order to keep it pointing at Earth as it moved relative to the stars.

It wouldn't need to turn as fast to stay focused, maybe increasing the lifetime of its reaction wheels.

It's the same thing as having to move the antenna to keep it pointed at the ground!

As an aside, how do space telescopes handle pointing antennas at earth?

GAIA uses a phased array that can always beam towards earth as the telescope rotates (see this answer), and TESS stores, compresses and processes almost two weeks of data while measuring near apoapsis, then zooms past Earth and sends it in an 8 hour burst during periapsis. (See this answer and this answer).

In GEO, a space telescope could use a single stationary radio dish on Earth for its data transfer.

It wouldn't be a stationary antenna! The telescope would could in a single direction, but the Earth would be constantly moving with respect to the stars. You'd still have to constantly move the antenna while you were transmitting and observing at the same time, in order to keep it pointing at Earth as it moved relative to the stars.

It wouldn't need to turn as fast to stay focused, maybe increasing the lifetime of its reaction wheels.

It's the same thing as having to move the antenna to keep it pointed at the ground!

It wouldn't need to turn as fast to stay focused, maybe increasing the lifetime of its reaction wheels.

It's the same thing as having to move the antenna to keep it pointed at the ground!

As an aside, how do space telescopes handle pointing antennas at earth?

GAIA uses a phased array that can always beam towards earth as the telescope rotates (see this answer), and TESS stores, compresses and processes almost two weeks of data while measuring near apoapsis, then zooms past Earth and sends it in an 8 hour burst during periapsis. (See this answer and this answer).

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