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Lower orbits are faster, higher is slower, so by adjusting orbit altitude you can get an orbit that gains or lags until you are in position do execute a Hohmann transfer. The orbit period is around two hours and the velocities involved around a mile a second so 1000 miles does not have to take that long to close up. Especially if you get both craft change orbit to get a better ratio. For a worst case surface abort the CSM will be an hour away in that two hour orbit, so an Lunar Module orbit that takes three hours (CSM does 1.5 two hour orbits) will get rendezvous.

The trickier part comes if your inclination is different, but for an abort straight after landing this would be unchanged.

Lower orbits are faster, higher is slower, so by adjusting orbit altitude you can get an orbit that gains or lags until you are in position do execute a Hohmann transfer. The orbit period is around two hours and the velocities involved around a mile a second so 1000 miles does not have to take that long to close up. Especially if you get both craft change orbit to get a better ratio.

The trickier part comes if your inclination is different, but for an abort straight after landing this would be unchanged.

Lower orbits are faster, higher is slower, so by adjusting orbit altitude you can get an orbit that gains or lags until you are in position do execute a Hohmann transfer. The orbit period is around two hours and the velocities involved around a mile a second so 1000 miles does not have to take that long to close up. Especially if you get both craft change orbit to get a better ratio. For a worst case surface abort the CSM will be an hour away in that two hour orbit, so an Lunar Module orbit that takes three hours (CSM does 1.5 two hour orbits) will get rendezvous.

The trickier part comes if your inclination is different, but for an abort straight after landing this would be unchanged.

1
source | link

Lower orbits are faster, higher is slower, so by adjusting orbit altitude you can get an orbit that gains or lags until you are in position do execute a Hohmann transfer. The orbit period is around two hours and the velocities involved around a mile a second so 1000 miles does not have to take that long to close up. Especially if you get both craft change orbit to get a better ratio.

The trickier part comes if your inclination is different, but for an abort straight after landing this would be unchanged.