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While reading the recent question 'http://space.stackexchange.com/questions/3698Do exercise machines on the ISS generate electric energy?', I got thinking all of the exerciser machines generate heat (heat energy). So yes all exercise machine generate energy for the ISS. But is that energy a positive attribute or a negative attribute to the homeostasis?

We have an exceptional answer on 'http://space.stackexchange.com/questions/2539Air temperature and humidity inside the ISS' about how many different air control systems there are on the ISS and how they all work. It is very complex, and it seems that as there is no central control they are probably working at cross purposes on occasion (heating vs cooling). Obviously being in orbit around the earth the ISS will alternately be exposed to the sun, or in the shadow of the earth. I would assume that heating and cooling requirements fluctuate during the 92 minute orbit.

Does the ISS require a net heat input, or does it need to shed more heat than it makes? If it needs to shed heat (cool) is there any attempt to limit heating producing activities to the period when the ISS is in earths shadow?

While reading the recent question 'http://space.stackexchange.com/questions/3698', I got thinking all of the exerciser machines generate heat (heat energy). So yes all exercise machine generate energy for the ISS. But is that energy a positive attribute or a negative attribute to the homeostasis?

We have an exceptional answer on 'http://space.stackexchange.com/questions/2539' about how many different air control systems there are on the ISS and how they all work. It is very complex, and it seems that as there is no central control they are probably working at cross purposes on occasion (heating vs cooling). Obviously being in orbit around the earth the ISS will alternately be exposed to the sun, or in the shadow of the earth. I would assume that heating and cooling requirements fluctuate during the 92 minute orbit.

Does the ISS require a net heat input, or does it need to shed more heat than it makes? If it needs to shed heat (cool) is there any attempt to limit heating producing activities to the period when the ISS is in earths shadow?

While reading the recent question 'Do exercise machines on the ISS generate electric energy?', I got thinking all of the exerciser machines generate heat (heat energy). So yes all exercise machine generate energy for the ISS. But is that energy a positive attribute or a negative attribute to the homeostasis?

We have an exceptional answer on 'Air temperature and humidity inside the ISS' about how many different air control systems there are on the ISS and how they all work. It is very complex, and it seems that as there is no central control they are probably working at cross purposes on occasion (heating vs cooling). Obviously being in orbit around the earth the ISS will alternately be exposed to the sun, or in the shadow of the earth. I would assume that heating and cooling requirements fluctuate during the 92 minute orbit.

Does the ISS require a net heat input, or does it need to shed more heat than it makes? If it needs to shed heat (cool) is there any attempt to limit heating producing activities to the period when the ISS is in earths shadow?

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Does the ISS need more heating or more cooling?

While reading the recent question 'http://space.stackexchange.com/questions/3698', I got thinking all of the exerciser machines generate heat (heat energy). So yes all exercise machine generate energy for the ISS. But is that energy a positive attribute or a negative attribute to the homeostasis?

We have an exceptional answer on 'http://space.stackexchange.com/questions/2539' about how many different air control systems there are on the ISS and how they all work. It is very complex, and it seems that as there is no central control they are probably working at cross purposes on occasion (heating vs cooling). Obviously being in orbit around the earth the ISS will alternately be exposed to the sun, or in the shadow of the earth. I would assume that heating and cooling requirements fluctuate during the 92 minute orbit.

Does the ISS require a net heat input, or does it need to shed more heat than it makes? If it needs to shed heat (cool) is there any attempt to limit heating producing activities to the period when the ISS is in earths shadow?