4 deleted 337 characters in body
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Currently, the rocket fleet of the United Launch Alliance (Atlas and Delta) can not compete with others in regards to price. ESA and Roskosmos can launch most payloads much cheaper than US rockets can. When NASA would outsource their own payloads in that scale to international partners, it could safe them money in the long run.

But currently there is noare plenty of launch system available in the world for the 10t - 20t range, but none which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, haswill have a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: China with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view. The Chinese having a world-wide monopoly on launching 100t chunks into orbit would be quite a problem for US international interests.

Currently, the rocket fleet of the United Launch Alliance (Atlas and Delta) can not compete with others in regards to price. ESA and Roskosmos can launch most payloads much cheaper than US rockets can. When NASA would outsource their own payloads in that scale to international partners, it could safe them money in the long run.

But currently there is no launch system available in the world which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, has a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: China with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view. The Chinese having a world-wide monopoly on launching 100t chunks into orbit would be quite a problem for US international interests.

Currently there are plenty of launch system available in the world for the 10t - 20t range, but none which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, will have a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: China with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view. The Chinese having a world-wide monopoly on launching 100t chunks into orbit would be quite a problem for US international interests.

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    Post Deleted by Philipp
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Currently, the NASA rocket fleet of the United Launch Alliance (Atlas and Delta) can not compete with others in regards to price. ESA and Roskosmos can launch most payloads much cheaper than US rockets can. When NASA would outsource their own payloads in that scale to international partners, it could safe them money in the long run.

But currently there is no launch system available in the world which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, has a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: China with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view. The Chinese having a world-wide monopoly on launching 100t chunks into orbit would be quite a problem for US international interests.

Currently, the NASA rocket fleet can not compete with others in regards to price. ESA and Roskosmos can launch most payloads much cheaper than US rockets can.

But currently there is no launch system available in the world which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, has a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: China with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view. The Chinese having a world-wide monopoly on launching 100t chunks into orbit would be quite a problem for US international interests.

Currently, the rocket fleet of the United Launch Alliance (Atlas and Delta) can not compete with others in regards to price. ESA and Roskosmos can launch most payloads much cheaper than US rockets can. When NASA would outsource their own payloads in that scale to international partners, it could safe them money in the long run.

But currently there is no launch system available in the world which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, has a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: China with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view. The Chinese having a world-wide monopoly on launching 100t chunks into orbit would be quite a problem for US international interests.

2 added 120 characters in body
source | link

Currently, the NASA rocket fleet can not compete with others in regards to price. ESA and Roskosmos can launch most payloads much cheaper than US rockets can.

But currently there is no launch system available in the world which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, has a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can currently offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: ChineseChina with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view. The Chinese having a world-wide monopoly on launching 100t chunks into orbit would be quite a problem for US international interests.

Currently, the NASA rocket fleet can not compete with others in regards to price. ESA and Roskosmos can launch most payloads much cheaper than US rockets can.

But currently there is no launch system available in the world which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, has a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can currently offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: Chinese with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view.

Currently, the NASA rocket fleet can not compete with others in regards to price. ESA and Roskosmos can launch most payloads much cheaper than US rockets can.

But currently there is no launch system available in the world which can get more than 23 tons to low earth orbit. The SLS, however, has a LEO capacity of 70t - 130t. That would open up a whole new market segment on which neither ESA nor Roskosmos can offer anything.

There is, however, another player who emerges on the market for launch systems and who is currently developing a rocket with LEO capacity in that scale: China with its Long March 9. Leaving that market exclusively to the Chinese could be a dangerous move from a geopolitical point of view. The Chinese having a world-wide monopoly on launching 100t chunks into orbit would be quite a problem for US international interests.

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