We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
3 replaced http://space.stackexchange.com/ with https://space.stackexchange.com/
source | link

To add to @aramis' excellent explanation@aramis' excellent explanation on clarity and ability to discern the go/no-go launch status check polling, these seem to have been introduced to NASA's (and U.S. in general) launch terminology during the first manned spaceflights of Project Mercury. I wasn't able to find a good example for Project Mercury launches, but I did find this video of Gemini 5 launch, where the CBS commentator already adopted this terminology (from Gemini launch command) and says several times that the launch status is "go", spacecraft status is "go", and so on.

Before manned spaceflight, this "go/no-go" polling was used in military aviation as "go/no-go for liftoff", especially in the U.S. navy with aircraft carrier pilots and likely also test pilots, where status of several complex systems has to be coordinated between stations before they can be cleared for takeoff. Since first astronauts came from those aviators, it is no wonder that this military aviation terminology found its way into the spaceflight terminology, where station polling makes just as much sense.

One other thing to note is that these statuses of such complex systems are not communicated verbally alone, but also signalised visually. First manned spaceflights coincided with the advent of computing with first computer networks soon to follow (like SAGE and SABRE), and mission controllers could have other centralized means of checking the status of individual stations before computer networks, for example with light switchboards in their mission command / launch control center. The status of individual stations would thus be called out via radio, as well as entered into the centralized system.

So not everything depends on verbal commands alone, and several layers of control are used with station polling to avoid any miscommunication errors.

To add to @aramis' excellent explanation on clarity and ability to discern the go/no-go launch status check polling, these seem to have been introduced to NASA's (and U.S. in general) launch terminology during the first manned spaceflights of Project Mercury. I wasn't able to find a good example for Project Mercury launches, but I did find this video of Gemini 5 launch, where the CBS commentator already adopted this terminology (from Gemini launch command) and says several times that the launch status is "go", spacecraft status is "go", and so on.

Before manned spaceflight, this "go/no-go" polling was used in military aviation as "go/no-go for liftoff", especially in the U.S. navy with aircraft carrier pilots and likely also test pilots, where status of several complex systems has to be coordinated between stations before they can be cleared for takeoff. Since first astronauts came from those aviators, it is no wonder that this military aviation terminology found its way into the spaceflight terminology, where station polling makes just as much sense.

One other thing to note is that these statuses of such complex systems are not communicated verbally alone, but also signalised visually. First manned spaceflights coincided with the advent of computing with first computer networks soon to follow (like SAGE and SABRE), and mission controllers could have other centralized means of checking the status of individual stations before computer networks, for example with light switchboards in their mission command / launch control center. The status of individual stations would thus be called out via radio, as well as entered into the centralized system.

So not everything depends on verbal commands alone, and several layers of control are used with station polling to avoid any miscommunication errors.

To add to @aramis' excellent explanation on clarity and ability to discern the go/no-go launch status check polling, these seem to have been introduced to NASA's (and U.S. in general) launch terminology during the first manned spaceflights of Project Mercury. I wasn't able to find a good example for Project Mercury launches, but I did find this video of Gemini 5 launch, where the CBS commentator already adopted this terminology (from Gemini launch command) and says several times that the launch status is "go", spacecraft status is "go", and so on.

Before manned spaceflight, this "go/no-go" polling was used in military aviation as "go/no-go for liftoff", especially in the U.S. navy with aircraft carrier pilots and likely also test pilots, where status of several complex systems has to be coordinated between stations before they can be cleared for takeoff. Since first astronauts came from those aviators, it is no wonder that this military aviation terminology found its way into the spaceflight terminology, where station polling makes just as much sense.

One other thing to note is that these statuses of such complex systems are not communicated verbally alone, but also signalised visually. First manned spaceflights coincided with the advent of computing with first computer networks soon to follow (like SAGE and SABRE), and mission controllers could have other centralized means of checking the status of individual stations before computer networks, for example with light switchboards in their mission command / launch control center. The status of individual stations would thus be called out via radio, as well as entered into the centralized system.

So not everything depends on verbal commands alone, and several layers of control are used with station polling to avoid any miscommunication errors.

2 added 168 characters in body
source | link

To add to @aramis' excellent explanation on clarity and ability to discern the go/no-go launch status check polling, these seem to have been introduced to NASA's (and U.S. in general) launch terminology during the first manned spaceflights of Project Mercury. I wasn't able to find a good example for Project Mercury launches, but I did find this video of Gemini 5 launch, where the CBS commentator already adopted this terminology (from Gemini launch command) and says several times that the launch status is "go", spacecraft status is "go", and so on.

Before manned spaceflight, this "go/no-go" polling was used in military aviation as "go/no-go for liftoff", especially in the U.S. navy with aircraft carrier pilots and likely also test pilots, where status of several complex systems has to be coordinated between stations before they can be cleared for takeoff. Since first astronauts came from those aviators, it is no wonder that this military aviation terminology found its way into the spaceflight terminology, where station polling makes just as much sense.

One other thing to note is that these statuses of such complex systems are not communicated verbally alone, but also signalised visually. First manned spaceflights coincided with the advent of computing with first computer networks soon to follow (like SAGE and SABRE), and mission controllers could have other centralized means of checking the status of individual stations before computer networks, for example with light switchboards in their mission command / launch control center. The status of individual stations would thus be called out via radio, as well as entered into the centralized system.

So not everything depends on verbal commands alone, and several layers of control are used with station polling to avoid any miscommunication errors.

To add to @aramis' excellent explanation on clarity and ability to discern the go/no-go launch status check polling, these seem to have been introduced to NASA's (and U.S. in general) launch terminology during the first manned spaceflights of Project Mercury. I wasn't able to find a good example for Project Mercury launches, but I did find this video of Gemini 5 launch, where the CBS commentator already adopted this terminology and says several times that the launch status is "go", spacecraft status is "go", and so on.

Before manned spaceflight, this "go/no-go" polling was used in military aviation as "go/no-go for liftoff", especially in the U.S. navy with aircraft carrier pilots and likely also test pilots, where status of several complex systems has to be coordinated between stations before they can be cleared for takeoff. Since first astronauts came from those aviators, it is no wonder that this military aviation terminology found its way into the spaceflight terminology, where station polling makes just as much sense.

One other thing to note is that these statuses of such complex systems are not communicated verbally alone, but also signalised visually. First manned spaceflights coincided with the advent of computing with first computer networks soon to follow (like SAGE and SABRE), and mission controllers could have other centralized means of checking the status of individual stations before computer networks, for example with light switchboards in their mission command / launch control center. The status of individual stations would thus be called out via radio, as well as entered into the centralized system.

So not everything depends on verbal commands alone, and several layers of control are used with station polling to avoid any miscommunication errors.

To add to @aramis' excellent explanation on clarity and ability to discern the go/no-go launch status check polling, these seem to have been introduced to NASA's (and U.S. in general) launch terminology during the first manned spaceflights of Project Mercury. I wasn't able to find a good example for Project Mercury launches, but I did find this video of Gemini 5 launch, where the CBS commentator already adopted this terminology (from Gemini launch command) and says several times that the launch status is "go", spacecraft status is "go", and so on.

Before manned spaceflight, this "go/no-go" polling was used in military aviation as "go/no-go for liftoff", especially in the U.S. navy with aircraft carrier pilots and likely also test pilots, where status of several complex systems has to be coordinated between stations before they can be cleared for takeoff. Since first astronauts came from those aviators, it is no wonder that this military aviation terminology found its way into the spaceflight terminology, where station polling makes just as much sense.

One other thing to note is that these statuses of such complex systems are not communicated verbally alone, but also signalised visually. First manned spaceflights coincided with the advent of computing with first computer networks soon to follow (like SAGE and SABRE), and mission controllers could have other centralized means of checking the status of individual stations before computer networks, for example with light switchboards in their mission command / launch control center. The status of individual stations would thus be called out via radio, as well as entered into the centralized system.

So not everything depends on verbal commands alone, and several layers of control are used with station polling to avoid any miscommunication errors.

1
source | link

To add to @aramis' excellent explanation on clarity and ability to discern the go/no-go launch status check polling, these seem to have been introduced to NASA's (and U.S. in general) launch terminology during the first manned spaceflights of Project Mercury. I wasn't able to find a good example for Project Mercury launches, but I did find this video of Gemini 5 launch, where the CBS commentator already adopted this terminology and says several times that the launch status is "go", spacecraft status is "go", and so on.

Before manned spaceflight, this "go/no-go" polling was used in military aviation as "go/no-go for liftoff", especially in the U.S. navy with aircraft carrier pilots and likely also test pilots, where status of several complex systems has to be coordinated between stations before they can be cleared for takeoff. Since first astronauts came from those aviators, it is no wonder that this military aviation terminology found its way into the spaceflight terminology, where station polling makes just as much sense.

One other thing to note is that these statuses of such complex systems are not communicated verbally alone, but also signalised visually. First manned spaceflights coincided with the advent of computing with first computer networks soon to follow (like SAGE and SABRE), and mission controllers could have other centralized means of checking the status of individual stations before computer networks, for example with light switchboards in their mission command / launch control center. The status of individual stations would thus be called out via radio, as well as entered into the centralized system.

So not everything depends on verbal commands alone, and several layers of control are used with station polling to avoid any miscommunication errors.