Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Another name for our moon could be Luna by the ancient Roman deity that is, according to ancient beliefs, embodiment of the Moon. Roman / Latin names for celestial bodies (and sometimes their adjectivestheir adjectives) are frequently used. In fact, we all know e.g. the planets Mars, Neptune, Venus,... by their Latin names for a god of war, god of fresh waters and the sea, and goddess of love, respectively, and less frequently use their Greek equivalents Ares, Poseidon, and Aphrodite.

And the Moon / Luna is known by many other names in other cultures. For example, in Greek mythology, it would be Selene, goddess of the Moon, or rarer, Cynthia or even Artemis, both the names of the Greek goddess of the hunt, forests and hills, the Moon, and archery. Obviously, this implies another name for the Moon - Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing. And, say, Chinese equivalent would be Chang'e, their mythological goddess of the Moon (relevant to space exploration since the China National Space Administration chose this name for their lunar exploration program, and you might have heard of some of the Chang'e lunar orbiters and landers, e.g. the Chang'e 3 that delivered a small rover named YutuYutu, in English Jade rabbit, to the Moon). The list could go on, as evidenced for example by this Wikipedia's list of lunar deities.

Another name for our moon could be Luna by the ancient Roman deity that is, according to ancient beliefs, embodiment of the Moon. Roman / Latin names for celestial bodies (and sometimes their adjectives) are frequently used. In fact, we all know e.g. the planets Mars, Neptune, Venus,... by their Latin names for a god of war, god of fresh waters and the sea, and goddess of love, respectively, and less frequently use their Greek equivalents Ares, Poseidon, and Aphrodite.

And the Moon / Luna is known by many other names in other cultures. For example, in Greek mythology, it would be Selene, goddess of the Moon, or rarer, Cynthia or even Artemis, both the names of the Greek goddess of the hunt, forests and hills, the Moon, and archery. Obviously, this implies another name for the Moon - Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing. And, say, Chinese equivalent would be Chang'e, their mythological goddess of the Moon (relevant to space exploration since the China National Space Administration chose this name for their lunar exploration program, and you might have heard of some of the Chang'e lunar orbiters and landers, e.g. the Chang'e 3 that delivered a small rover named Yutu, in English Jade rabbit, to the Moon). The list could go on, as evidenced for example by this Wikipedia's list of lunar deities.

Another name for our moon could be Luna by the ancient Roman deity that is, according to ancient beliefs, embodiment of the Moon. Roman / Latin names for celestial bodies (and sometimes their adjectives) are frequently used. In fact, we all know e.g. the planets Mars, Neptune, Venus,... by their Latin names for a god of war, god of fresh waters and the sea, and goddess of love, respectively, and less frequently use their Greek equivalents Ares, Poseidon, and Aphrodite.

And the Moon / Luna is known by many other names in other cultures. For example, in Greek mythology, it would be Selene, goddess of the Moon, or rarer, Cynthia or even Artemis, both the names of the Greek goddess of the hunt, forests and hills, the Moon, and archery. Obviously, this implies another name for the Moon - Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing. And, say, Chinese equivalent would be Chang'e, their mythological goddess of the Moon (relevant to space exploration since the China National Space Administration chose this name for their lunar exploration program, and you might have heard of some of the Chang'e lunar orbiters and landers, e.g. the Chang'e 3 that delivered a small rover named Yutu, in English Jade rabbit, to the Moon). The list could go on, as evidenced for example by this Wikipedia's list of lunar deities.

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So, when it comes to terminology and naming conventions (nomenclature), you should never neglect to mention what language, culture and use you're interested in. I know you did, I'm just trying to additionally emphasize that it makes a difference. But, to cut the long story short and answer your question more directly:

Does The Moon have an agreed upon international astronomical name?

Yes. The Moon. And this is the English language naming convention recommended by the International Astronomical Union (IAU):

The IAU formally recommends that the initial letters of the names of individual astronomical objects should be printed as capitals; e.g., Earth, Sun, Moon, etc. "The Earth's equator" and "Earth is a planet in the Solar System" are examples of correct spelling according to these rules.

Additionally, if I may, what you posit in the penultimate paragraph of your question seems somewhat flawed. There is a distinction between a sun and the Sun in that while they both suggest a star that is a parent to planets, i.e. a planetary system and not merely a star, the former form is both frequently used (saying, e.g., "This planet has two suns because it orbits a binary star." would be perfectly acceptable, why not?) as well as both being distinct enough with the use of articles a or the, so they cannot be ambiguous with a proper use.

The linked to post (I'm not quoting all of it to avoid being seen as plagiarism) then goes on to explain that such forms are approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The Wikipedia page you quote seems only partially correct and neglects to mention capitalization of proper nouns. Which is somewhat amusing considering its own page on proper nouns clearly stating:

So, when it comes to terminology and naming (nomenclature), you should never neglect to mention what language, culture and use you're interested in.

Additionally, if I may, what you posit in the penultimate paragraph of your question seems somewhat flawed. There is a distinction between a sun and the Sun in that while they both suggest a star that is a parent to planets, i.e. a planetary system and not merely a star, the former form is both frequently used (saying, e.g., "This planet has two suns because it orbits a binary star." would be perfectly acceptable, why not?) as well as both being distinct enough with the use of articles a or the, so they cannot be ambiguous with a proper use.

The linked to post (I'm not quoting all of it to avoid being seen as plagiarism) then goes on to explain that such forms are approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The Wikipedia page you quote seems only partially correct and neglects to mention capitalization of proper nouns. Which is somewhat amusing considering its own page on proper nouns clearly stating:

So, when it comes to terminology and naming conventions (nomenclature), you should never neglect to mention what language, culture and use you're interested in. I know you did, I'm just trying to additionally emphasize that it makes a difference. But, to cut the long story short and answer your question more directly:

Does The Moon have an agreed upon international astronomical name?

Yes. The Moon. And this is the English language naming convention recommended by the International Astronomical Union (IAU):

The IAU formally recommends that the initial letters of the names of individual astronomical objects should be printed as capitals; e.g., Earth, Sun, Moon, etc. "The Earth's equator" and "Earth is a planet in the Solar System" are examples of correct spelling according to these rules.

Additionally, if I may, what you posit in the penultimate paragraph of your question seems somewhat flawed. There is a distinction between a sun and the Sun in that while they both suggest a star that is a parent to planets, i.e. a planetary system and not merely a star, the former form is both frequently used (saying, e.g., "This planet has two suns because it orbits a binary star." would be perfectly acceptable, why not?) as well as both being distinct enough with the use of articles a or the, so they cannot be ambiguous with proper use.

The Wikipedia page you quote seems only partially correct and neglects to mention capitalization of proper nouns. Which is somewhat amusing considering its own page on proper nouns clearly stating:

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And the Moon / Luna is known by many other names in other cultures. For example, in Greek mythology, it would be Selene, goddess of the Moon, or rarer, Cynthia or even Artemis, both the names of the Greek goddess of the hunt, forests and hills, the Moon, and archery. Obviously, this implies another name for the Moon - Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing. And, say, Chinese equivalent would be Chang'e, their mythological goddess of the Moon (relevant to space exploration since the China National Space Administration chose this name for their lunar exploration program, and you might have heard of some of the Chang'e lunar orbiters and landers, e.g. the Chang'e 3 that delivered a small rover named Yutu, in English Jade rabbit, to the Moon). The list could go on, as evidenced for example by this Wikipedia's list of lunar deities.

And the Moon / Luna is known by many other names in other cultures. For example, in Greek mythology, it would be Selene, goddess of the Moon, or rarer, Cynthia or even Artemis, both the names of the Greek goddess of the hunt, forests and hills, the Moon, and archery. Obviously, this implies another name for the Moon - Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing. And, say, Chinese equivalent would be Chang'e, their mythological goddess of the Moon (relevant to space exploration since the China National Space Administration chose this name for their lunar exploration program, and you might have heard of some of the Chang'e lunar orbiters and landers, e.g. the Chang'e 3 that delivered a small rover named Yutu, in English Jade rabbit, to the Moon).

And the Moon / Luna is known by many other names in other cultures. For example, in Greek mythology, it would be Selene, goddess of the Moon, or rarer, Cynthia or even Artemis, both the names of the Greek goddess of the hunt, forests and hills, the Moon, and archery. Obviously, this implies another name for the Moon - Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing. And, say, Chinese equivalent would be Chang'e, their mythological goddess of the Moon (relevant to space exploration since the China National Space Administration chose this name for their lunar exploration program, and you might have heard of some of the Chang'e lunar orbiters and landers, e.g. the Chang'e 3 that delivered a small rover named Yutu, in English Jade rabbit, to the Moon). The list could go on, as evidenced for example by this Wikipedia's list of lunar deities.

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