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The ISS currently handles a crew of 6 launched by two Soyuz vehicles. With the advent of Commercial Crew bring 4 a mission, the hope is to run a crew of 7.

Where in the ISS do the crew sleep?

The US Segment has quarters in the Harmony module, but how many?

US Module Crew quarters

The Russian segment has room to sleep, but for how many?

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  • $\begingroup$ This might be a good place to start, it has links to some videos: nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/ditl_sleeping $\endgroup$ – Phiteros Jul 14 '16 at 16:12
  • $\begingroup$ Pretty much answered in How do astronauts sleep in zero G? $\endgroup$ – Andrew Thompson Jul 14 '16 at 16:19
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    $\begingroup$ I'm surprised to learn that they have special sleeping quarters. I thought they just strapped down their sleeping bags where ever there was some unused space. Like the uboatmen did. Are lullabies sung for these poor test pilots too? You sleep when and where you fall asleep by fatigue. Don't like it? Don't apply. For the right stuff only. Cut the PC costs, allow real human ability to excel! $\endgroup$ – LocalFluff Jul 14 '16 at 16:46
  • $\begingroup$ @LocalFluff Hehe. Molly coddled astronaughts? I blame the Sklyab revolt. Mostly on the US side it is to give them a private personal space. They can sleep where they can find a quiet spot, but this way they get a 'room' small as it might be. $\endgroup$ – geoffc Jul 14 '16 at 17:37
  • $\begingroup$ Congrats, LocalFluff, I can no longer tell when you're joking. $\endgroup$ – Russell Borogove Jul 14 '16 at 19:43
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The Russian segment has two sleep stations in the Zvezda module, which is at the far aft end of the station. In this video, Garret Reisman shows the two off.

The US Harmony node has 4 sleep stations.

That accounts for six spots. With the advent of commercial crew, it makes you wonder what the plan for the 7th crew member will be.

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  • $\begingroup$ Don't they have rotating shifts, so having a crew of 7 means that you don't need 7 sleeping spots, because they wouldn't ever be allowed to sleep all at once? Just as they do in submarines currently, where there are less bunks than crewmembers. $\endgroup$ – Peteris Jul 15 '16 at 12:25
  • $\begingroup$ @Peteris it's called "hot racking" -- the person before you leaves it "hot" (well, warm) for you. $\endgroup$ – rory.ap May 13 at 11:32

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