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What kind of systems or technology is developed for ISS (International Space Station)? There are so many debris at higher orbits than ISS, but many of them has started deorbiting so we have a potential risk that some debris could collide with ISS. Illustrating even with examples is ok, such as different damages suffered before by the ISS and which technology served as protection or solution for these sittuations. Another element that has to do with safety is the evacuating process how fast could be done that?

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marked as duplicate by kim holder Aug 6 '16 at 17:21

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    $\begingroup$ What does "safe enough" actually mean for you? It all comes down to the chance of incident you are willing to tolerate. So what level of safety are you asking about? $\endgroup$ – BSteinhurst Aug 6 '16 at 14:30
  • $\begingroup$ @BSteinhurst what kind of materials and protection they have for ISS, had before damages that could cause serious problems to the ISS (coommand systems),what size of debris it can handle and that could be repaired, which parts of the ISS are secured more and that could serve as a life boat. I am not speaking for catastrophic failures, but sometimes something could be broken, could cause small explosions in some segments or depressurize them. How would the ISS avoid the larger space debris and what plans are for these upcoming debris from higher orbits in the next years. $\endgroup$ – J. Young Aug 6 '16 at 16:10
  • $\begingroup$ @BSteinhurst at a scenario that ISS is damaged and loosing height how fast could be evacuated the crew. How much time is needed in an emergency evacuation? $\endgroup$ – J. Young Aug 6 '16 at 16:12
  • $\begingroup$ To answer all the questions raised in your comments would be too long for answers here, they are meant to be no longer than about a page. You could consider asking follow up questions. I think what was meant was more that it would be clearer to ask how safe the station is, rather than if it is safe enough, which depends on opinion. $\endgroup$ – kim holder Aug 6 '16 at 16:18
  • $\begingroup$ For instance, 'What kind of damages has the ISS suffered from debris' could be a separate question - in fact really ought to be as a proper answer would be a few paragraphs. $\endgroup$ – kim holder Aug 6 '16 at 16:23

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