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What might happen to the lunar atmosphere after a time of major human presence or activity on Earth's natural satellite? After hundreds of touchdowns and flyoffs and disturbances to environment?

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    $\begingroup$ Your question leaves room for interpretation. What is major presence? You may improve your question by referencing actual scenarios. $\endgroup$ – Andreas Oct 28 '16 at 18:46
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    $\begingroup$ I think the second sentence hundreds of touchdowns and flyoffs and disturbance to environment" is meant to be an explanation for major presence. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 29 '16 at 0:31
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh We could put a great answer on the effects of Aerozine on the lunar atmosphere, but I'm not sure if that is what is asked. BTW, NASA's LADEE mission would be a good source.. $\endgroup$ – Andreas Oct 29 '16 at 18:07
  • $\begingroup$ @Andreas I've just asked this related question. Also, with issues of electrical charge, solar photon pressure, and orbital mechanics, the fate of dust particles and gas molecules is really interesting! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 30 '16 at 1:09
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    $\begingroup$ I agree this is a very interesting field. Yet, this question will not get my upvote until it is edited to be more specific. $\endgroup$ – Andreas Oct 30 '16 at 14:39
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Assuming a more permanent human presence, we should have came up with a solution to the atmospheric conditioning of the moon. Maybe something like a magnetic field to hold in place denser gases which provide a building block for a space dome.

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The Moon does have an atmosphere. It is about 1,000,000 particles per m2, this is not very much compared to Earths 10,000,000,000,000,000,000. It is about comparable to the atmosphere that exists in the same region that the ISS orbits - 330 - 435km.

If you launched a rocket whatever gases were produced would likely not hang around long, of course there would be trace amounts and exactly what gases would depend on the fuel/oxidizer used in the rocket.

The moon's atmosphere currently consists of helium, argon and possibly neon, ammonia, methane and carbon dioxide. This discovery was made by the Lunar Atmospheric Composition Experiment (LACE) that was placed on the lunar surface on the Apollo 17 mission. On Earth we have used telescopes to detect sodium and potassium in the atmosphere.

Source NASA: Is there an atmosphere on the moon?

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    $\begingroup$ Your cite of the source is wrong, the lunar atmosphere has less than 1,000,000 molecules in a cubic centimeter, not a square meter. Molecules per area does not make sense, it is per volume. A cubic mteter has one million cubic centimeter. The lunar atmosphere has less than 1,000,000,000,000 molecules per cubic meter. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Nov 8 '16 at 12:27
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    $\begingroup$ The refereced source even says "cubic centimeter", which would be cm$^3$. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Jan 3 '17 at 12:40
  • $\begingroup$ It would probably be better to refer to the Moon's exosphere, as the reference does toward the end; there is a qualitative difference between that and a typical atmosphere. $\endgroup$ – Nathan Tuggy Apr 2 '17 at 2:00

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