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This answer to the question Which specifications should a tablet computer have in order to work in outer space? points out that capacitive-sensitive touch pads, mouse pads and touch-sensitive screens could be difficult to use if you are wearing the glove of a pressure suit in space.

Can the laptops seen in various locations on the ISS be used when wearing spacesuits? Can the cursor be moved (if the software needs it)? Actually can one even reliably push individual keys and buttons on the laptops while wearing any of the possible suits one might be wearing in an emergency in various scenarios?

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    $\begingroup$ Sure, that's why I am not answering. Just noting that a simple technological solution might be possible. $\endgroup$ – jkavalik Dec 3 '16 at 9:58
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    $\begingroup$ This would never happen. There is no contingency situation that involves the crew wearing EVA suits in a depressurized ISS. If the station leaks down, the crew abandons it in the Soyuz. If a single module leaked down, it would be isolated and powered off (too much equipment is air cooled) $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Dec 3 '16 at 16:31
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    $\begingroup$ The ISS laptops are Thinkpads with trackpoints, though I imagine those would still be difficult to use with the fat fingers of a suit glove. $\endgroup$ – pericynthion Dec 3 '16 at 20:57
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh sorry for a late response, just tried it with a very cheap plastic stylus on my touchpad, using skiing glove and piece of plastic foil and then pliers with a rubber handle (with and without the glove) and the cursor moved when I put a bit of pressure on it which is how it behaves with my bare hand too (it was really a "gift" to some chinese phone cover so the quality is quite low). $\endgroup$ – jkavalik Dec 3 '16 at 21:09
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    $\begingroup$ Given @OrganicMarble's comment about lack of situations prompting the scenario, plus the fact that the laptops are supposedly only used for non-(time)-critical tasks, I very much suspect that this has never even been considered. Besides, a standard laptop (even with certain adaptations to work in a freefall environment) would have very serious heat dissipation problems without an atmosphere. You think it's bad running a computer without any fans? Hint: most will hit hard thermal shutdown limits very quickly. Try without even convective cooling. It might work for a few minutes, if you're lucky. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Dec 4 '16 at 19:03
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I'll "amalgamate" the comments below the question. The scenario is highly unlikely, but either through loss of pressure or contamination of the atmosphere, either ISS crew or an arriving crew could possibly need to be in the ISS while wearing a pressure or EVA suit. The OP asks if the laptops could be operated by someone wearing said suit, pointing out that the ThinkPads seen on the ISS are equipped with built-in capacitive track pads but no external mouse.

It was pointed out that the ThinkPads also have the little red Trackpoint - a sort of nano-joystick, but probably those would be fairly hard to use with a gloved hand as well.

It was then pointed out that the laptops are for non-essential tasks, so there may be little need to use them, unless of course Commodore Decker left his final log entries on one of the laptops.

It was then pointed out that in the case of a substantial or complete pressure loss, if they worked at all, they would overheat quickly. (Oh yeah, fans). Of course if the issue were a contaminant (e.g. ammonia, or CO2, or smoke) or biohazard in the atmosphere, the laptops might still work fine.

Enter 21st century touch-screen controls, possibly touch-screen everything. While voice command might possibly help in some cases, like they say, in space, Siri can't hear you say OK Google.

Thus, enter Boeing's new suit, including gloves with sausages er... cheese sticks, ok advanced materials for fingertips that will work on capacitive touch sensitive screens:

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    $\begingroup$ ISS EVA suits use sublimator cooling. They cannot work in any kind of atmosphere so would be useless in a contamination situation. I believe the Boeing suits are similar to the Shuttle ACES suit in function and are intended for survival/escape situations only (I could be wrong on that) $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Jan 29 '17 at 2:46
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    $\begingroup$ @OrganicMarble that's a really good point! You are welcome to edit this "amalgam" answer in any way you like, or post an improved version. My goal is to increase the fraction of my unanswered questions that receive good answers, not necessarily to answer them myself. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jan 29 '17 at 2:59

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