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I believe that it's common knowledge that Max-Q is the point in which a rocket is undergoing the maximum dynamic stress during a launch and ascent. But, how often have rockets actually been destroyed or failed at this point (or close to it) during launch due to Max-Q stresses? I've seen videos of many launches which fail with rapid disassembly before this point, but can't really recall that Max-Q is a statistically large factor in rocket launch failures. Am I mistaken, or have rocket designs evolved such that Max-Q is a known factor that's been successfully planned into rocket design and manufacture?

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    $\begingroup$ The trajectories/throttle settings are designed to not exceed the Q limit. In other words this is a known constraint that is managed. When they blow up, it's usually due to an unmanaged factor. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Apr 20 '17 at 18:41
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    $\begingroup$ The significance of Max Q is not so much that everyone can breathe a sigh of relief when it's over, rather that it's an important event that the trajectory and sequencing are designed around. $\endgroup$ – pericynthion Apr 21 '17 at 6:07
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    $\begingroup$ MaxQ could mean doom in case the engines fail to throttle down when required. It's an unlikely scenario and I doubt it ever occurred but I don't think it's impossible. $\endgroup$ – SF. Apr 21 '17 at 13:39
  • $\begingroup$ I believe the Maiden flight of the Ariane V was destroyed because of excess aerodynamic stresses $\endgroup$ – Jake Blocker Jul 6 '17 at 0:09
  • $\begingroup$ The Ariane V failure was caused by a software error. $\endgroup$ – Dohn Joe Sep 20 '18 at 8:02
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Rockets usually fail early in flight, within a minute of liftoff, or in the vacuum stage since that is hard to simulate on Earth. You can see a list of rocket failures here. The structure is one of the most reliable rocket parts, the failures are mainly related to fuel pumping and bad design decisions.

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    $\begingroup$ Nice answer! I can understand why the question is interesting; in every live broadcast I've watched there is almost always some significant commenting made during the Max-Q phase. I wonder if it is such a "big deal" because there's nothing else to talk about then, or because it's costly (in terms of propellant/payload masses) to slow down or hold back thrust during this phase, rather than because it's a particularly dangerous phase, which it seems it isn't? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jul 4 '17 at 5:20
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    $\begingroup$ This does not answer the question about failures due to Max-Q stresses $\endgroup$ – Jan Doggen Jul 4 '17 at 6:52
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh Max-Q is known well in advance. It is a dangerous phase if you simply plow into it unprepared. But since its known so well beforehand, the rocket throttles down and stays within structural limits. Afterwards, you can throttle up again. It is a significant event in the flight, but not really something to worry about. NASA did multiple tests to ensure that the LES for mercuy/gemini/apollo would work at max-q since that is the point where the LES gets most stresses and an abort is most dangerous. But again, the LES can handle it, its designed for it. I think its more historical relevanc $\endgroup$ – Polygnome Jul 4 '17 at 10:06
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    $\begingroup$ @Polygnome yes I understand that. Take a look again at my comment. I'm discussing why one might ask the question in the first place, and suggesting that it might be related to the fact that broadcasts bring it up in every launch as if it were a particularly notable event, and then suggesting that while it is not particularly notable in terms of safety, it might be worth exploring why it is always brought to the attention to the viewing public in such a visible way each time. If you can address that instead in some way, that would be great! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jul 4 '17 at 10:34
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh I think its brought up because its the most notable event during that flight phase, and because it is somewhat significant for manned launches, because any LES would have the hardest time during that phase. The question is, why wouldn't you bring it up? Sport commentators bring up lots of tangential information all the time. Its only natural a commentator for a launch would do the same. In fact, they bring up lots of other tangential stuff as well. $\endgroup$ – Polygnome Jul 4 '17 at 10:38
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Both of the shuttle flights that suffered fatal accidents encountered significant wind shear events that took place very close to max q. I'm not aware that this was directly linked to the accidents but there were people involved in the STS-107 accident investigation who were very suspicious that this was a coincidence.

STS-51L:

Max q was at 59 seconds. Max vehicle response to wind shear was at 61.724 seconds.

STS-107:

Max q was at ~58 seconds (I'm reading off a graph). The wind shear started at 57 seconds.

I just read of another incident, a Proton launch in Feb 1969, where the "newly designed" payload fairing collapsed at max q. (Soviet Robots in the Solar System, Huntress & Marov, p. 195).

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The uncrewed Mercury-Atlas 1 flight suffered a catastrophic failure due to aerodynamic loads at or near max-Q, and the launcher's structure was beefed up for future flights:

[NASA's Owen Maynard] stated in an oral history interview that his post-flight calculations showed the skin of the launch vehicle just below the spacecraft would have buckled due to the combined drag, acceleration, and bending loads which exceeded the resisting tensile stress in the skin provided by internal pressure. Maynard recalled that "The problem of mating the Mercury capsule to the Atlas was far from being properly resolved at the time of MA-1." Based on that finding, the NASA specified that future Mercury-Atlas launch vehicles add doublers to the skin structure in that area, and that future launch trajectories be shallowed to reduce pitch angle rate, to reduce the bending stress on the launch vehicle.

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