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Abdominal Thrusts (the "Heimlich maneuver") and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) are life-saving first aid procedures that involve carefully targeted manual forcing of a victims body in order to dislodge an obstruction that is preventing breathing, or to move oxygenated blood in the case of heart failure.

When done properly, both of these depend upon working against gravity to generate sufficient force.

Have procedures been developed to do these in weightlessness?

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above: Illustration of Abdominal Thrusts (the "Heimlich maneuver"), from here

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above: Demonstration of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) on a simulated patient, from here

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    $\begingroup$ Relevant: humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/Evidence/medicalConditions/… $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Jun 8 '17 at 16:23
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    $\begingroup$ We monitor humans very carefully before sending them to them to space. Prevention is the best medicine :-). Moreover, CPR alone is usually not enough (i believe <10% success rate; i can try to source that) CPR is mostly done to preserve the body as much as possible while better tools/medicine are on the way. $\endgroup$ – Antzi Jun 8 '17 at 16:38
  • $\begingroup$ @Antzi Monitoring is a good stop-gap for most situations that might require CPR, but the Heimlich is often required in situations for which you can't monitor in advance. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Jun 8 '17 at 16:42
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    $\begingroup$ I don't see an issue with the Heimlich - the victim is between the rescuer and the rescuer's hands - no external force needed . CPR is harder, but I suspect there would be an AED available to defibrillate/restart the heart. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Jun 8 '17 at 16:59
  • $\begingroup$ @JonCuster apparently NASA did not se an issue with CPR in 2001 either (according to manual shown in OrganicMarble's answer) but not seeing a problem does not mean there isn't one. There must be some reasons that training for abdominal thrusts instructs you to stand the victim up first. Also if you are alone there are variants that use gravity and a chair. Let's wait for an authoritative answer instead of performing first aid speculation. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jun 9 '17 at 1:28
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Why, by the checklist, of course:

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The Heimlich maneuver is referred to, but not described, i.e. "perform Heimlich maneuver", so it must be standard.

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    $\begingroup$ The very first thing is restraining the patient with bungees. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Jun 8 '17 at 17:47
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    $\begingroup$ That was my assumption as well, I was just surprised to find that it wasn't documented. I guess it's standard enough that it's not worthy of mention. $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Jun 8 '17 at 17:52
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    $\begingroup$ There's a lot of interesting stuff in that checklist. Like BEHAVORIAL- SUICIDIAL -EMERGENCY $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Jun 8 '17 at 17:56
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    $\begingroup$ Is this 2001 manual and its images the most recent version, or have there been updates as the've figured this out? I heard something about this on the radio last night, found it here this morning; bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05597y6 update: dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4573096/… please consider adding some of this! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jun 9 '17 at 2:06
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    $\begingroup$ There should be a picture showing how to restrain the patient and the helper. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Jun 9 '17 at 7:51

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