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In our space missions, we use gravity assists by planets to change the speed relative to the sun. The speed relative to planets remains the same. We cannot use the sun for gravity assists.

In Interstellar movie, the black hole was the center of their system and their velocities were relative to it. So using it as means to get higher velocity correct? Am I missing something in this?

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  • $\begingroup$ A look through Kip Thorne's "The Science of Interstellar" might help. He's got a section in it where he talks all about gravitational assists. helli.ir/portal/sites/default/files/… $\endgroup$ – Phiteros Jul 15 '17 at 19:21
  • $\begingroup$ Chapter 27 details the escape from Gargantua. Also, there is a part in the "Technical Notes" section which gives the relevant formulae and numbers necessary to prove the maneuver. $\endgroup$ – Phiteros Jul 15 '17 at 19:31
  • $\begingroup$ Worth noting, recent research indicates naked singularities are impossible in our universe (or in any universe where electromagnetic forces are stronger than gravitational forces for that matter); that fact wasn't known at the time of filming "Interstellar" though, so you can't hold that against the filmmakers. $\endgroup$ – SF. Jul 16 '17 at 0:21
  • $\begingroup$ Worth noting, recent research indicates naked singularities are impossible in our universe Not true. This problem is called cosmic censorship, and it's still an open problem. People are still exploring various ways of even describing the hypothesis. In any case, why are naked singularities relevant here? $\endgroup$ – Ben Crowell Jul 16 '17 at 16:50