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In this nice video musing about (among other things) the US Naval Observatory's $3,500 expedition to Baker City or at least Baker County Oregon to observe the June 18, 1918 solar eclipse, there is also one of the photos of a penumbral shadow taken by the Expedition 12 crew during the March 29, 2006 solar eclipse.

Have there been others? One additional example would be sufficient for an answer. I'm curious how many different solar eclipse penumbral shadows on the Earth have been photographed by people from space, but one more is good enough for this question. Thanks!


below: Screenshot from the video, photo credits available at the end.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ There should be some pictures taken by weather satellites. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Jul 23 '17 at 14:31
  • $\begingroup$ Another very good one: svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/30758 $\endgroup$ – Uwe Jul 23 '17 at 15:02
  • $\begingroup$ @Uwe I don't know the exact figures, but probably the Earth has been photographed with complete coverage (except the poles) at least once per hour (maybe per 2-hours in the beginning) for the last fifty years. It's probably safe to say that every penumbral shadow for the last fifty years has been photographed by satellites. These penumbral shadows last for many hours as they slowly move. I'd be surprised if there was one non-polar-region penumbra that hasn't been. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jul 23 '17 at 18:12
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    $\begingroup$ You mean the moon's shadow ? $\endgroup$ – Antzi Aug 20 '17 at 8:00
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Here is another, not as nice, taken March 20, 2015 by Samantha Cristoforetti.

enter image description here

From here

There is a whole article on this on collectspace with other examples. Here's one from Mir in 1999. enter image description here And one from the ISS in 2002 enter image description here

Added one taken by ISS crewmember Paolo Nespoli on August 21 2017. enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ The page says "I think this is it: the umbra." The umbra of an eclipse should be completely black. Every eclipse is different, but they are around ~100 km wide, sometimes more, sometimes less or zero or even below (in the case of annular eclipses where there is no umbra. I'll check out the details tomorrow - the position of the Sun, Moon, and ISS can be easily extracted with Skyfield and we can see if there was an umbra viewable at the time. It might be just beyond the terminator here. Looks good, thanks! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Aug 14 '17 at 16:21
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    $\begingroup$ This one was way up near the north pole, so it may have been a bit of a challenge; en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SE2015Mar20T.png $\endgroup$ – uhoh Aug 14 '17 at 16:24
  • $\begingroup$ @uhoh a timely article was published on collectspace, I have updated my answer. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Aug 17 '17 at 19:59
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    $\begingroup$ I stopped by to mention this but you've already updated your post - excellent! It says they saw this shadow on three consecutive passes. It goes on to say that "It was only the seventh time that a spacecraft's crew had seen a total solar eclipse (as visible from the Earth) in the almost 60 years of human spaceflight." and links to Total view: A brief history of solar eclipses seen from space $\endgroup$ – uhoh Aug 22 '17 at 0:27
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    $\begingroup$ Astronaut Randy Bresnik's eclipse tweets: 1, 2 and 3. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Sep 11 '17 at 10:41

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