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Is this the ISS from Antalya, Elmali, 23.7.2017 morning around 03:00 hours? enter image description here Photo 4 frames of 30 seconds each, with 1 second in between each frame, all images superimposed with star movement taken out.

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There are several easy-to-use websites that can help answer your question. One example is heavens-above.com and another is in-the-sky.org. You can try both. In-the-sky is a recently developed site and works very well on mobile devices as well as computers, and hand has a planetarium mode and a helpful "What's in the sky?" button.

I clicked on your location on the location page, and it gave me your time zone as UTC+03:00.

I'm not sure what "around 03:00 hours" means. It's really really important for you to keep track of the exact times of your exposures, and to make sure the clock in your camera is set correctly!

From the home page, you can select Spacecraft from the menu and there are options for sky maps or tables. Start with the table.

From the table shown, there are no noted passes of the ISS on the morning of July 23. It's a little bit early in the morning to have a good view of things in such a low orbit, about ~400km. At this time, most of the sky at that altitude is still in darkness (shadowed by Earth) and is not exposed to sunlight.

However, around this time there are several old rocket bodies passing by, and these seem to be at a much higher altitude. They may be slowly tumbling and that would definitely account for the pulsed (modulated) brightness as they passed, causing the dashed lines. I would not expect the ISS to produce so many cycles of bright and dim during part of one pass.

If you know the exact time of the photograph, you can choose one of the sky viewing options and dial in the exact time and watch the calculated motion of the satellites across the sky and compare directly to the photographs. I used the feature to make the GIF shown below. Incidentally the GIF proves that those astronomers did not observe the ISS either.

enter image description here

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below: GIF made from in-the-sky.org showing a spy satellite and the ISS both passing close to the moon. From this answer.

enter image description here

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