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I'm not a physicist or rocket man, but I laid awake thinking about this all night and I just wanted expert corrections to help with my basic understanding. So... 483,000 miles per hour is how fast our sun is moving through it's galactic orbit. What my thought is about is this: given my layman's understanding of relativity, it would appear to me that if you're flying, say, 20k mph towards mars, you aren't actually "flying towards" mars at all. Instead you've simply managed to slow down enough for Mars to catch up to you. Even at full thrust you are still technically moving "backwards." If you reverse this logic and fly towards the sun, you are still traveling at 483k mph plus whatever speed the shuttle can add. Can you slingshot around the sun/venus, without sacrificing your speed, to reach the outer solar system incredibly fast? The basic thought is, if you fly away from the sun you're slowing down, if you fly towards the sun you're speeding up. If you want to reach the outer solar system, fly towards the sun first. If you leave orbit and can succeed in a gravity slingshot around the sun or venus, would you not pass earth traveling a relative speed of almost 1000k mph? I'm sorry if this is a bad question, but I have tried to learn a little about relativity and to me it would seem this makes sense.

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