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This question already has an answer here:

It is already mentioned that ISS orbit the earth 15 times a day, how we design a dish network to stay communicate with it along its path? Are we build a dish in Atlantic Ocean too?

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marked as duplicate by Organic Marble, Nathan Tuggy, JCRM, Fred, James Jenkins Nov 2 '17 at 17:48

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    $\begingroup$ Check out TDRS... $\endgroup$ – DJohnM Nov 1 '17 at 17:41
  • $\begingroup$ they have a fixed a dish on earth, but a dynamic dish on ISS? $\endgroup$ – Mohammad Fajar Nov 3 '17 at 11:29
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NASA communicates with the ISS through their Space Network, which consists of a constellation of satellites including ones in geosynchronous orbit, low earth satellites, and ground facilities that relay between NASA and the satellites. It's available 24/7 and allows constant communication with the ISS, including voice, telemetry, etc.

More at: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/scan/services/networks/sn

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While the Apollo-era space program had to rely on ground stations for communication, a network of geostationary satellites called TDRSS has been in use since the 1980s to provide continuous communication with spacecraft in orbit (as well as to the south pole!).

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  • $\begingroup$ but, how about this question: How NASA directed a rocket during launcing the first geostationer satellite, there is no other satellite for it to communicate? $\endgroup$ – Mohammad Fajar Nov 1 '17 at 18:22
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    $\begingroup$ Why would you need a satellite? We have had radios for a long time, long before there were satellites. $\endgroup$ – Jörg W Mittag Nov 1 '17 at 19:01
  • $\begingroup$ I don't know exactly how TDRS-1 was guided into position, but almost certainly it was through some combination of communication from ground stations, ships at sea, and onboard automation. $\endgroup$ – Russell Borogove Nov 1 '17 at 19:24
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    $\begingroup$ TDRSS is not used for guidance. TDRS-1 was launched on a IUS which used inertial guidance. arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.1978-1292 globalsecurity.org/space/systems/ius.htm $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Nov 1 '17 at 19:44
  • $\begingroup$ I mean, it is difficult to make a dish keep track with ISS, because ISS orbitting the earth 15 a day, so they must build a dish with specialized motor to track it. But why in ISS they can build that? I mean ISS must communicate with a network of Geostationary satellite, so its must be equipped with specialized dish with a motor so it can track where TDRS satellite located. $\endgroup$ – Mohammad Fajar Nov 3 '17 at 11:28

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