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I have been wondering about why oxyhydrogen (HHO) (a ~2:1 H2/O2 stoichiometric mixture) hasn't been used as a fuel? I know it has been used for bottle rockets and other types of small scale rockets, and I know hydrogen and oxygen have been used as fuel (like in the delta IV) but could it be used for a large scale rocket? Would there be any problems with just one fuel tank holding both the oxidizer and fuel (maybe it would be dangerous to keep them together?) Would there be any changes needed to engines to use HHO as a fuel?

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    $\begingroup$ As a gas, it's prohibitively voluminous for rocket use; as a liquid, it's incombustible water. $\endgroup$ – Russell Borogove Feb 20 '18 at 21:22
  • $\begingroup$ what if you condensed it? $\endgroup$ – jasper Feb 20 '18 at 21:26
  • $\begingroup$ what if you stored it as water but then used a generator to seperate it before being injected into the engine? And how does it kill people? Toxicity? Explosions? $\endgroup$ – jasper Feb 20 '18 at 21:28
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    $\begingroup$ @jasper I did, all the reputable links I found talk about debunked water fueled cars, or the use of HHO as a fuel additive not as an actual fuel. $\endgroup$ – Lex Feb 20 '18 at 22:05
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    $\begingroup$ HHO gas isn't practical to store/handle at the scale needed for anything more than a toy rocket; it would also be kinda dangerously explosive. If you chilled it down to liquefy it for more practical storage, the oxygen would condense, then freeze solid before the hydrogen condensed. So, you'd want/need to keep the liquid hydrogen and oxygen in separate tanks, which is what rockets do. $\endgroup$ – Anthony X Feb 21 '18 at 3:43
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Oxyhydrogen is an extremely bad idea for a fuel. It is highly explosive, and too dangerous to be used on rockets.

But rockets today do use liquid hydrogen as fuel which is oxidized by liquid oxygen(Lox/LH2) as it is cheap and provides extremely high thrust and can be controlled to burn steadily. It is one of the most powerful liquid propellants.It also yields the highest specific impulse of any currently used rocket propellant.

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