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What are those things spraying something at the pad during the beginning of a Falcon 9 launch?

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marked as duplicate by Rory Alsop, Hobbes, peterh, Hohmannfan Feb 24 '18 at 9:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the image linked does not exist and there's almost no textual description. $\endgroup$ – Nathan Tuggy Feb 24 '18 at 3:20
  • $\begingroup$ @NathanTuggy I replaced with working link. $\endgroup$ – mckap325 Feb 24 '18 at 3:22
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It is a sound suppression system like the one developed by NASA for the Space Shuttle in the 1980s. It was required to keep the sound level below the required 145 dB. See: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/sound-suppression-system.html

On launch pad 39A in Cape Canaveral, a water tower dumps 300,000 gallons of water in less than a minute during take off. I am not certain of the specs (gallons and noise levels) on this particular launchpad.

See question: "What is the purpose of the jets of water often under rocket engines during launch?"

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Water-deluge systems have long been a common part of large rocket launches. It supplies sound suppression for the launch and also prevents the back-blast from the engines from critically damaging the launch pad or rebounding from the pad back into the rocket itself.

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