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In the last month, a group from University of Colorado, Boulder, published a paper on Nature Astronomy entitled "Inventory of $CO_2$ available for terraforming Mars", which was highly publicized on popular media. In the work the authors claim that the $CO_2$ reserves on Mars are not enough to support the generation of an artificial greenhouse effect, thus thwarting most of the terraforming plans.

Taking this study in consideration, is there any alternative realistic strategy to perform the martian terraforming process using little or none $CO_2$ to do the greenhouse effect?

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  • $\begingroup$ Have you looked at space.stackexchange.com/questions/634/… and space.stackexchange.com/questions/20635/…? $\endgroup$ – Don Branson Aug 29 '18 at 19:38
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    $\begingroup$ From what I've been looking at, there seems to be enough CO2 to support some plants, the problem is water, nitrogen, and temperature. The pressure, presently seems to be a bit of a grey-area. $\endgroup$ – anon Aug 29 '18 at 19:56
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    $\begingroup$ It's probably too early to tell at this point--we just don't know enough about Mars yet. The paper's abstract concludes with "terraforming Mars is not possible using present-day technology" which is a no-brainer in my opinion. It's pretty obvious that if we wanted to terraform a planet, we would need newer, better, and more advanced technology. Terraforming a planet would be the biggest project ever undertaken by humanity by dozens of orders of magnitude. $\endgroup$ – Dragongeek Aug 30 '18 at 11:31
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    $\begingroup$ We are not able to terraform Mars now and also for the next decades. Hopefully we will not need all available resources for terraforming Earth when the needed technology for Mars would be available. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Aug 30 '18 at 12:27

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