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Two F-1 engines were recovered from a depth of 14,000 feet (4,300 m), about 400 miles (640 km) east of Cape Canaveral after 40 years in the ocean.

There is much damage caused by splash down but very little caused by corrosion of salt water to be seen in this image:

enter image description here

Inconel alloys are oxidation-corrosion-resistant materials used for many parts of the F-1.

But what about the other parts of the SI-C stage, the tanks and structures made from aluminium alloys with poor corrosion resistance? After splash down and more than 40 years in salt water there may be very few left on the ocean floor. Parts made of thin sheet metall will be fully dissolved.

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    $\begingroup$ I hadn't seen the cleaned-up version of the recovered F-1 before, very cool. $\endgroup$ Sep 26, 2018 at 16:52
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for adding the picture. It is a huge improvement of the question. $\endgroup$
    – Uwe
    Sep 27, 2018 at 16:09

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From collectspace, here's a photo of part of an S-IC stage underwater after 40+ years:

enter image description here

It's hard to tell the condition of the alloy itself due to the overgrowth, but while shattered, it doesn't look badly corroded.

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    $\begingroup$ More impressive images after the recovery and during conservation. $\endgroup$
    – Uwe
    Sep 26, 2018 at 21:24
  • $\begingroup$ Very hard to tell what is missing due to splash down and what due to 40+ years in salt water. $\endgroup$
    – Uwe
    Sep 27, 2018 at 16:12
  • $\begingroup$ The condition of the material in the bottom center along the dark/light seam appears very much intact; I don't think the salt water is corroding anything away. $\endgroup$ Sep 27, 2018 at 16:16
  • $\begingroup$ There are aluminium alloys for shipbuilding with high corrosion resistance to sea water used for ship building and there are other alloys used for aircrafts with low corrosion resistance in sea water that are not suited to shipbuilding. I think it is unlikely that alloys for shipbuilding were used for the Saturn V. The aircraft company Boeing that build the first stage most likely used aircraft alloys with high mechanical strength but low corrosion resistance in sea water. Aircrafts may use several layers of paint for corrosion protection during decades, but not first stages. $\endgroup$
    – Uwe
    Sep 27, 2018 at 20:22
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    $\begingroup$ I believe being completely and continuously immersed in seawater is much less corrosive than spending time at the ocean's surface, where both salt and plentiful free oxygen are available. $\endgroup$ Sep 27, 2018 at 20:25

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