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Have any systems on any Mars rovers failed (even partially) as a result of a dust storm?

There is the obvious problem of loss of solar power, but the failures there are the result of loss of power. Here I'd like to ask about a system issue directly caused by the storm and the dust in it. These might include contamination, mechanical interference, electrostatic charging, abrasion, fouled electrical connectors or bearings...

below: from PIA22486 "A self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity rover taken on Sol 2082 (June 15, 2018). A Martian dust storm has reduced sunlight and visibility at the rover's location in Gale Crater."

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below x2: From Panorama of Vera Rubin Ridge PIA22545 "After snagging a new rock sample on August 9, 2018 (Sol 2137), NASA's Curiosity rover surveyed its surroundings on Mars, producing a 360-degree panorama of its current location on Vera Rubin Ridge [...] The panorama includes umber skies, darkened by a fading global dust storm. It also includes a rare view by the Mast Camera of the rover itself, revealing a thin layer of dust on Curiosity's deck.

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  • $\begingroup$ slightly related: How will the ExoMARS Rover keep it's solar panels dust-free and collecting maximum power? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 4 '18 at 10:52
  • $\begingroup$ I bet lots of failures can be partially attributed to dust - for example, I believe the main explanation for Spirit's wheel failure was thermal cycling damaging the motor, but I'm sure dust in the mechanism can't have helped! $\endgroup$ – Jack Oct 4 '18 at 13:15
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    $\begingroup$ @Jack The question works hard to constrain itself to dust storm. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 4 '18 at 16:40
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    $\begingroup$ Understood - my example below doesn’t really answer the question, but I like how it shows that even the simplest things can go wrong on Mars because space is hard! $\endgroup$ – Jack Oct 4 '18 at 17:27
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Not specifically during a single storm, but:

One interesting case of a partial failure of a system is that of the optical calibration targets on Opportunity, Spirit and Curiosity. They were frequently photographed by on-board cameras (Pancam for Spirit and Opportunity, Mastcam for Curiosity) and the images used to calibrate the colour and brightness of the data to a 'true-colour' standard.

Accumulation of dust on the surface of the targets made this calibration more difficult and, as a result, it's thought that the quality of the images suffered.

Fortunately, occasional wind helped keep the targets relatively clean. Furthermore, since the targets are perfectly positioned for imaging, the observation of dust accumulation rates helped in developing atmospheric dust models.

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Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell

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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh the ‘occasion wind’ link has some detail on how they used a dust accumulation model to compensate, but I’m not sure how successfully... $\endgroup$ – Jack Oct 4 '18 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ I'm hoping someone will ask separately ;-) $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 4 '18 at 17:46

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