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I have wondered for years if the Apollo moon missions, especially Apollo 11, had any contingency plans in case they met either aliens or other humans (presumably Russians) on the Moon.

Granted that the Moon was well-known to be a dead world and finding native "moon people" there was extremely unlikely, who's to say if beings from some other world might be there for some reason or another?

It was considerably more likely that they might have encountered other humans. The Soviets, for instance, had actually planned to launch their own first moon landing just days before Apollo 11 launched but their mission got scrubbed due to technical issues and never got rescheduled. But NASA presumably knew about that mission and may have made contingency plans - which the Apollo 11 crew might have rehearsed - since the abort of the Soviet mission didn't happen until very shortly before Apollo 11 set off. Of course, the contingency plan was probably only needed if the Soviets had landed within walking distance of Apollo 11. I have no idea where they planned to land but it seems improbable that they would land that close.

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    $\begingroup$ "The Soviets, for instance, had actually planned to launch their own first moon landing just days before Apollo 11 launched but their mission got scrubbed due to technical issues and never got rescheduled." No, they never had a successful launch of their moon rocket. I fear your question is based on a false premise since you go on to say this " since the abort of the Soviet mission didn't happen until very shortly before Apollo 11 set off. " No, not at all. The 2nd N1 test was in July 1969 and failed. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Oct 24 '18 at 1:10
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    $\begingroup$ Related: space.stackexchange.com/q/10342/195 $\endgroup$ – Russell Borogove Oct 24 '18 at 1:30
  • $\begingroup$ @Organic Marble - Sorry, I got the details wrong. I knew there was a failed mission in mid-July 1969 but I misremembered most of the details of what happened and what the aftermath was. Thanks for setting the record straight. In any case though, in the months leading up to Apollo 11's departure, they would have at least faced the possibility that the Soviets might be on the Moon when they were there - or arrive after Apollo 11 had. If I were a NASA administrator who knew that, I'd want some kind of protocol/policy set on how to deal with that and make sure I told the astronauts about it. $\endgroup$ – Henry Oct 29 '18 at 19:25
  • $\begingroup$ @Organic Marble - So, having said that, did NASA actually formulate a policy on that and communicate it to the astronauts during their training, which went on for many months before the takeoff, when there would have been no certainty that the Soviets would be absent from the moon? If so, what was that policy? $\endgroup$ – Henry Oct 29 '18 at 19:30
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In 1969 the Soviets were several years behind the Americans. Development of the N-1 wasn't going too well, in 1969 they were working on the second of up to 12 test flights before a manned flight could be undertaken with any safety. After Apollo 11, all urgency for the Soviet manned lunar program was lost (the fourth and last N-1 launch was in 1972).

There was some contact between the Russians and Americans. During Apollo 11, the Russian unmanned Luna 15 probe was scheduled to land. The Russians informed NASA of Luna's intended trajectory. Unfortunately the mission crashed instead of the intended soft landing and sample return.

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