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These would be very worthy videos since there is air in the Lunar Module and they don't wear the heavy spacesuits, so one could see how they behave on the Moon in a breathable atmosphere and without heavy spacesuits.

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    $\begingroup$ One of the issues with the Apollo lunar modules was the were very cramped $\endgroup$ – Fred Oct 30 '18 at 8:31
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    $\begingroup$ What was the pressure inside the Lunar Module? $\endgroup$ – user27822 Oct 30 '18 at 9:52
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    $\begingroup$ From the NASA quick reference data for the lunar module pdf: $\endgroup$ – Uwe Oct 30 '18 at 10:12
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    $\begingroup$ That would mean about 0.33 atm. Thank you for the link. $\endgroup$ – user27822 Oct 30 '18 at 10:22
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    $\begingroup$ Imagine you were making a movie. Pretty quickly you'd realize that your mock-up LM would need to have lots of removable panels so that the camera could see from an interesting angle without extreme distortion. And you'd spend hours planning and preparing each shot. Needless to say, the real LM didn't have lift-off panels and a camera crew outside with a boom. Today at best you might be able to put tiny wide-angle cameras all over the interior surfaces and sort out the video later to get at least a little that wasn't a head or elbow blocking a lens; that wasn't really practical then. $\endgroup$ – Chris Stratton Oct 30 '18 at 13:40
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While not on the lunar surface, it turns out that in-flight footage of donning and removing suits inside the LM during the Apollo 16 mission does exist.

One source is https://www.sciencephoto.com/media/239627/view however the origin is presumably a government document available from other places as well.

The perspective is surprisingly good for cramped quarters, but that's likely in no small part due to the fact that it was shot either through or in the docking tunnel by Ken Mattingly who would remain in the command module when the LM separated to land. Likely it would have been much harder to capture anything interesting with an unmanned camera located in the cramped confines of the LM itself.

Today we might be able to put little recording webcams all over the interior surfaces and select unblocked shots later, or perhaps even do some sort of synthetic image stitching to combine captures from multiple points. But even a single wide-angle motion picture camera on the docking tunnel cover would have been a fair amount of complexity; the interesting sights were outside.

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    $\begingroup$ "filmed by Ken Mattingly from the docking tunnel connecting the lander to the Command Module"; this probably helped the perspective a lot. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Oct 30 '18 at 13:52
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. Unfortunately, the video seems to be in time-lapse. $\endgroup$ – user27822 Oct 30 '18 at 14:21
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    $\begingroup$ The frame rate might be a hair slow but it is within the realm of motion video. If you are seeing a time-lapse effect, perhaps your connection is having issues or the site's software is not working well with your web browser. Perhaps you can find a source for the original which permits you to download it for offline viewing. $\endgroup$ – Chris Stratton Oct 30 '18 at 14:23
  • $\begingroup$ 16 won't count, strictly speaking, if Mattingly took the film, since by definition, the crew weren't on the lunar surface $\endgroup$ – NKCampbell Oct 30 '18 at 22:11
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    $\begingroup$ The fact that this was not on the surface is disclaimed at the top of the post, the rest is lagely about why footage on the surface would be difficult and disappointing. $\endgroup$ – Chris Stratton Oct 30 '18 at 22:44
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The Lunar module had a habitable volume of 160 cubic foot (4.5 cubic metre). The crew compartment floor was about 36 by 55 inches (3 by 4.6 foot or 0.91 by 1.4 metre)

There was a circuit breaker damaged accidentally by Aldrin on Apollo 11. The breaker would arm the main engine for lift off from the Moon. So all later astronauts knew they had to behave slowly and carefully not to damage anything inside the small cabin.

See this PDF from NASA.

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    $\begingroup$ I ain't gonna try anything. And the question isn't on how much space in the LM is there but if there are videos of the astronauts inside the LM while it's on the Moon's surface. $\endgroup$ – user27822 Oct 30 '18 at 12:25
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    $\begingroup$ well, your question was "Are there any videos of astronauts walking inside ..." and we're pointing out there's no room to walk. $\endgroup$ – Hobbes Oct 30 '18 at 12:53
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    $\begingroup$ You removed walking/jumping from the body, but there is still a walking left in the title of the question. $\endgroup$ – Uwe Oct 30 '18 at 12:54
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    $\begingroup$ I improved the question. $\endgroup$ – user27822 Oct 30 '18 at 13:09
  • $\begingroup$ Can you cite your interior dimensions? They differ from those found elsewhere and would necessitate a ceiling height of ~11.6ft, which seems excessive even without considering the entire ascent stage was ~12.3ft tall. The linked pdf gives numbers of approximately 3.5ft depth by 7.7ft height, which means the width must be ~6ft $\endgroup$ – TemporalWolf Oct 30 '18 at 22:29

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