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We know that in zero gravity; you can simulate gravity with centrifugal force. This works great for people, but if you had fish in a body of water, would the fish be subject to simulated gravity?

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes. Centrifugal force acts on everything, just like gravity. $\endgroup$
    – Hobbes
    Dec 20, 2013 at 15:25

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There are many processes in aquatic life that work, based on gravity.

  • Air bubbles float up.
  • Water levels separate based on temperature, because hotter water is lighter than colder water.
  • Oxygen moves from the surface down to lower levels as the water circulates.
  • Detritus sinks to the bottom, where it can decompose, allow plants to grow in it, etc.

Both these processes cause turn over of the body of water and create circulation patterns. Centrifugal gravity simulation would help with this. Some of these matter more in large bodies of water vs small bodies of water, and pumps could be used to help simulate some of it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Another gravitational effect is orientation. Fish have gas filled floatation bladders which keep them upright and neutrally buoyant. In microgravity, fish would be oriented randomly since there is no "up". $\endgroup$
    – Woody
    Oct 29, 2023 at 3:21

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