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Could solar sails work in place of solar vanes for passive stabilization in station keeping a satellite fixed in the Lagrange 2 point on a parallel orbit with the Moon?

Related:

What is the principle behind Mariner 4's "Solar Pressure Vanes"? In what case(s) would they be effective?

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure I understand the distinction between a solar sail and a solar vane, but that might just be me. $\endgroup$ – Roger Nov 22 '18 at 15:08
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A vane in this context is just an (articulated) panel used to alter the centre of pressure and effective orientation of the reflector. They are solar sails.

If you mean could these be entirely passive and still work: then no, not entirely. Some active control is required for station keeping. That said, the control doesn't have to be in moving the panel. Altering the reflective properties of the reflectors, of moving the centre of mass are also possible.

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Mariner 4's vanes articulate only to correct for unbalanced solar pressure, to help maintain attitude. To receive enough solar pressure to navigate, i.e. change attitude and (even harder) change course, you'd need something much larger. But even a big sail can only push you away from the sun -- more when facing it, less when sideways to it -- so a course correction might have to wait a few weeks until the moon is at the correct position in its orbit so the pressure is in the right direction in the earth-moon frame of reference. While you're waiting for that, you might deviate too far from your halo orbit.

Edit: @uhoh's comment is correct. Tilting the sail can accelerate you sunward albeit slowly. But maybe still too slow to stay in your halo orbit.

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