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In the NASA images and video library there is a image of a miniature bread floating in ISS node 1 (expedition 34 in 2013). Unfortunately I wasn't able to find any information on the experiment or general research this bread was part of (Google, Twitter, arXiv):

View of miniature bread floating

Source: https://images.nasa.gov/details-iss034e028521.html

So, why was there a miniature bread on ISS?

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    $\begingroup$ Without context, this picture is fantastically absurd. $\endgroup$ – SF. Dec 4 '18 at 16:40
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    $\begingroup$ "Why was there a miniature bread on the ISS?" For people to eat ;-) This looks like it might be delicious; zooming in, it looks perfect! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Dec 5 '18 at 4:52
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This article suggests it is just food: https://www.rbth.com/russian-kitchen/328572-russian-space-food-evolution

Bread should be prepared quite differently, so that it does not crumble and lasts a long time. The Russian Institute of the Bakery Industry had to come up with solution for using the bread at the International Space Station without the risk of crumbs getting into the ventilation system. They came up with a miniature loaf - just big enough for one bite. In texture and taste, this bread is virtually indistinguishable from that which we eat on Earth.

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you for the interesting read! Makes a lot of sense. I just noticed that there is a whole blister full of mini-breads in the hand... $\endgroup$ – Marcus Bitzl Dec 3 '18 at 22:12
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    $\begingroup$ @MarcusBitzl One 'loaf' is 3 grams. There are 10 in the pack, so it's mere 30 grams of bread - so about as much as a single slice of normal bread. "Year in orbit" contains a fragment on production of these. $\endgroup$ – SF. Dec 5 '18 at 11:47

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