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I love rockets. Planning to build a tin rocket but not with water and air pressure. I would like to build a small metal tin rocket using fuel as RP 1 and oxidizer as LOX. I know this is too hazardous please don't try this. Is that possible to build a metal tin rocket with the same fuel used in real rockets?

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    $\begingroup$ A water bottle rocket by definition has no combustion. You are trying to pressurize your chamber with combustion, so this is not a question about bottle rockets but a liquid fueled rocket, even if you add water as reaction mass. Hence the close votes since you are trying to make a pipe bomb. As a place to start asking the right questions suggest Ignition! by J Clark and possibly the early history of the A4/V2. $\endgroup$ – GremlinWranger Dec 21 '18 at 8:01
  • $\begingroup$ Hi MuthukumaaranC and welcome to Space Exploration SE! This isn't a site for model rocket building, or even amateur rocket building of any kind. Have a look around at the other questions here to get an idea of what kinds of things are on-topic, or check out the section in the Help Center about asking questions. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Dec 21 '18 at 8:26
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    $\begingroup$ LOX is some pretty nasty stuff. This board isn't here to help you commit suicide. $\endgroup$ – Loren Pechtel Dec 22 '18 at 3:59
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    $\begingroup$ After your edit to use a metal rocket body - rocketry.org.au/safety-information/model-rocket-safety-code rule one. To do otherwise at the hobby level is to be making pipe bombs and it is rule one for a very good reason. To get the question off hold you need to redefine it as 'how to I safely get into model rocketry', 'how does the space industry work with LOX' or similar $\endgroup$ – GremlinWranger Dec 22 '18 at 4:08
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    $\begingroup$ Even with editing, this question continues to be about dangerous experiments. As such, it should remain closed. $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon Jan 30 '19 at 1:31
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No.

  • the heat of combustion would soon melt your plastic bottle. RP/LOX rockets use special high-temperature metals like Inconel, and then still need to cool the nozzle to prevent melting.
  • a plastic bottle becomes brittle when you try to store LOX in it, it's unlikely to be strong enough to hold the LOX at any pressure

So we'd be talking about a different kind of rocket here: one built from metal, using two tanks to hold the LOX and RP, and with a combustion chamber to mix and ignite them.

The next step up from a bottle rocket is not LOX/RP. It's an Estes solid-fuel rocket.

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    $\begingroup$ meta.stackexchange.com/questions/194963/… $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Dec 21 '18 at 14:58
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    $\begingroup$ I disagree with the decision to declare all of model rocketry off-topic. That decision means we're sending people off into the wilderness instead of informing them. $\endgroup$ – Hobbes Dec 21 '18 at 15:24

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