2
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The most updated data available at spaceflight.nasa.gov show that on day 361 there was a reboost:

  IMPULSIVE TIG (GMT)   M50 DVx(FPS)   LVLH DVx(FPS)   DVmag(FPS) 
  IMPULSIVE TIG (MET)   M50 DVy(FPS)   LVLH DVy(FPS)   Invar Sph HA
  DT                    M50 DVz(FPS)   LVLH DVz(FPS)   Invar Sph HP 
  -----------------------------------------------------------------
  361/03:07:48.737          -1.0            2.1           2.1    
  N/A                       -0.5           -0.2           221.5  
  000/00:05:37.474           1.8           -0.1           215.8

In the same site, I see the lines:

    Vector Time (GMT): 2018/360/12:00:00.000
    Weight (LBS)     : 949740.4

and

    Vector Time (GMT): 2018/361/09:08:00.000
    Weight (LBS)     : 949512.8

the mass loss is about 103 kg.

If I recall correctly, I read that the cost to bring 1 kg of fuel to the ISS is about 10000/15000 dollars.
Can we say that that reboost cost about 1 million dollars?

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you wish to include the salaries of the engineers who planned, simulated, tested, uplinked, and executed the burn into your cost? Along with the costs of using the ground facilities to do this work? Or, just the prop? $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Dec 30 '18 at 13:31
  • $\begingroup$ Only the fuel would be fine, but I'm really interested in knowing how a reboost is planned, simulated, tested, uplinked and executed (not the cost, just the procedure). $\endgroup$ – Cristiano Dec 30 '18 at 14:16

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