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From what I read on the internet, I took around 3 days for Apollo 11 to get to the Moon. I'm curious what was the view from the windows of the spacecraft during the journey. What did the astronauts see, let's say on the 2nd day or halfway through the flight?

The answer to this question explains that it was quite difficult to see the stars from the moon surface. Did the same problems apply while flying to the moon?

Or maybe it was similar to this?

Were they able to see the stars, maybe even the sun? Was the sky black or was it slightly bluish, illuminated from the Earth?

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  • $\begingroup$ The Apollo 11 flight journal for day 2 is here: history.nasa.gov/afj/ap11fj/06day2-tv.html and includes some photos. At 029:32:14 there is a note to mention that the stack is in a PTC roll manoeuvre so the view would have been changing as the spacecraft rotated. I'm guessing the astronauts would have seen stars if their eyes were adapted to low light and the Earth or Moon weren't visible through the window??? $\endgroup$ – Dave Gremlin Dec 31 '18 at 13:13
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Seeing the stars through the sextant of the Command Module was important for the inertial platform alignment. The Lunar module also had a different sextant version for platform alignment on the surface of the Moon.

Seeing the stars through the window using the eyes only without optics was possible too if the window was not directed to the Sun. If there was no direct sunlight to the eyes allowing dark adaptation after some minutes in the dark the stars could be seen just like during a dark night on Earth without clouds.

Of course the sky was dark and not blue. There is very, very few dust in space, too few for scattering the blue light from the Earth's atmosphere.

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