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The Martian atmosphere is thinner and the magnetic field isn't present. I wonder how many asteroids fall and if at least the small ones can burn in the atmosphere before reaching the soil. Thanks in advance for your answers.

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    $\begingroup$ It's a good question! From Wikipedia's Meteoroid; Collision_with_Earth's_atmosphere "They usually disintegrate at altitudes of 50 to 95 km " and from Atmosphere model the Earth's atmosphere at 50 km has about 0.1% of the density it does at sea level, and is very roughly the same as Mars' "sea level" density. That plus the fact that Mars is closer to the asteroid belt might suggest the flux is much higher. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 19 at 6:39
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    $\begingroup$ This might be better asked in Astronomy SE though I think it's certainly on-topic here as well. Incidentally here's what one meteorite on Mars' surface looks like: Who discovered “Egg Rock”? The Curiosity rover or people? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 19 at 6:41
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It depends on what its made of, how fast it is traveling, etc.. The atmosphere of Mars being at the most around 2% of Earth's and most meteors 25 meters or less will break up in Earth atmosphere. Then a meteor less than .5 meters should break up on Mars. You can call a meteor that will make impact an asteroid.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_depth

https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/47754/minimum-size-of-an-asteroid-to-actually-impact-earth

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    $\begingroup$ So, among the various hazards of Mars for future colonists, we probably could add the meteors. Their impact could be much more frequent on that planet. I wonder how much frequent and possibly dangerous. $\endgroup$ – Bea Feb 20 at 3:40
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    $\begingroup$ @Bea almost as bad as the moon $\endgroup$ – Muze the good Troll. Feb 20 at 5:02

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