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Both Apollo and the Shuttle launched from KSC complex 39, and used liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as propellants. These cryogenic liquids were held in storage tanks near the perimeter of each launch pad (at the 11 o'clock and 3 o'clock positions in the picture below), until they were pumped into the spacecrafts prior to launch.

The thermal insulation of a storage tank is never perfect, and the cryogenic contents will slowly vaporize. How were the boiled-off gases treated? Were they simply released to the air, were they collected for further storage, or was there some system to burn these gases?

launch complex 39

Related:

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For shuttle:

The oxygen was dumped into a basin to boil off (red arrow) or released through the External Tank vent valve, through the "beanie cap", and out a pair of vent ducts that ran through the "beanie cap" access arm.

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The "beanie cap" and vent ducts.

The hydrogen was burned off in flare stacks (green arrow). The connection from the External Tank was through the External Tank hydrogen vent arm. You can see the ducting from it to the flare stacks at the right of the H2 schematic.

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The GH2 vent arm.

Sources: personal collection, personal photos.

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I think the LOX dump basin is the concrete square between the LOX sphere and the pad, but I need to confirm that.

Photo source: NASA, annotations mine

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