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My professor really wants to know if the IRIS transceiver, which flew on MarCo, will be used in LEO. In fact so much that he doesn't accept "no" for an answer. I have searched for an example but found nothing.

This is just what I expected because it is just overkill, to big and too expensive for your average CubeSat mission, even when talking about 3U. And who needs DSN support in LEO?

So I will try it here and ask if anyone knows of any mission which has used, or plans to use an IRIS transceiver in LEO, not just for commissioning but to stay there.

Read further about the IRIS cubesat transponder in this answer, the Iris V2.1 CubeSat Deep Space Transponder datasheet and in the NASA JPL page Iris V2 CubeSat Deep-Space Transponder (IRIS) .

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not 100% sure I fully understand your question yet. Do you have any idea why your professor will only accept "Yes" for an answer? Do you mean that he is sure it's going to be used in LEO but he doesn't know how, or just that he is sure it would be a reasonable option to use in LEO? If you are trying to make a case against using it, the best way to proceed would be to show that a lighter, lower cost, possibly lower power system (uses less power) would meet your requirements. Keep the focus on requirements, specifications, and merits, rather than only focused on what other people do. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jun 2 at 22:50
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    $\begingroup$ The IRIS data sheet does mention a lot of intriguing goodies, including some nice radio science options. If your cubesat mission will be exploring Earth's atmosphere, there might be some useful features there. But watch your power budget, with everything running it can draw 35 Watts. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jun 2 at 22:56
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    $\begingroup$ The 6U Lunar IceCube will use (1, 2) the IRIS cubesat transceiver, but it's not an answer because it starts in HEO and transfers to a lunar orbit rather than LEO. Interesting question, any further thoughts on my previous comments? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jun 4 at 1:48
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    $\begingroup$ My professor will only accept yes for an answer because he strongly believes it should be used in LEO, my supervisors for the seminar don't understand this either. He himself has no secure source if it will be used in LEO or not. He just really really wants it to be done. I plan to compare it with typical CubeSat transceivers, then the difference will be seen easily. I also know the Lunar IceCube, sadly we are really talking LEO, there is also LunarFlashLight and BioSentinel. All not in LEO $\endgroup$ – Clex Jun 4 at 7:42
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    $\begingroup$ Okay, I think your plan to do the comparison is a good one. Sometimes people have reasons for doing things that they don't share, so you may not be able to crack the puzzle of the professor's preference here in Stack Exchange. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jun 4 at 7:45
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I went ahead and emailed the responsible people at JPL. They confirmed that there is no planned mission for LEO with IRIS on board.

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