1
$\begingroup$

Ars Technica's Via the BBC, find out how Apollo 11’s Eagle actually landed says:

I've also learned things about the Lunar Module itself, including that it was made nearby on Long Island, where a museum preserves both training hardware and a flight-ready version that would have gone to the Moon on one of the missions that was ultimately cancelled.

Is the LM in this museum the same as the other modules that landed on the Moon, or is it of a newer design, based on the LMs that landed on the Moon but with some next-generation improvements or modifications?

$\endgroup$
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ This is LM-13 which might have been used on Apollo 18 (if not cancelled). Some info at americanspacecraft.com/pages/lunarmod/lm-13.html $\endgroup$ – amI Jun 24 at 8:44
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ That's worth putting as an answer @amI $\endgroup$ – GdD Jun 24 at 12:24
4
$\begingroup$

The exhibit is LM-13, which was scheduled for the Apollo 18 mission (which was cancelled). It's representative of the ones that actually did fly-to and land-on the moon.

However since then it has undergone a few modifications, tweaks etc. I don't know the extent of those alterations.

https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/218-apollo-lunar-module-lm-13

and

https://www.americanspacecraft.com/pages/lunarmod/lm-13.html

have further reading.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.