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After the Apollo Missions, what is the farthest that any country has sent astronauts into space (distance from Earth)?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Space! Do you only want missions that happened after the last Apollo lunar mission in December 1972? After the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in 1975? Or any mission not including Apollo? Please clarify the question, as it does matter. $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon Jul 9 at 18:51
  • $\begingroup$ Different but related question: Puzzler: Precisely what maximum distance from the Earth did the Apollo 13 astronauts achieve? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Jul 9 at 22:11
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    $\begingroup$ @peterh: Which Apollo? The lunar landing missions only, or Skylab and ASTP as well? $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon Jul 9 at 23:23
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    $\begingroup$ I just want to clarify. Yes, I know the Apollo missions sent astronauts the furthest into space than any other missions ever. My question is: what is the farthest astronauts have been out in space, excluding the Apollo missions. $\endgroup$ – Tomas Jul 10 at 16:11
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Highest altitude of all manned missions excluding Apollo: Gemini 11, 1372 km

(leaving this here for reference: ) Highest altitude dated after Apollo: Space Shuttle STS-31R (the Hubble launch), 620 km.

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    $\begingroup$ That's kinda sad, IMHO. $\endgroup$ – Eric Duminil Jul 10 at 7:08
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    $\begingroup$ It's sad we haven't gone beyond Earth orbit. High Earth orbits on the other hand, add risk for little to no reward, which is why all recent manned missions have been in pretty low orbits. $\endgroup$ – Hobbes Jul 10 at 16:26
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    $\begingroup$ @EricDuminil It's way better than the farthest we've sent humans the opposite direction (into the crust/mantle) $\endgroup$ – Punintended Jul 10 at 16:37
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    $\begingroup$ The reason is largely the Van Allen belts. Radiation is much worse outside them, and especially bad while going through them. Not good for either crew or equipment. $\endgroup$ – DrSheldon Jul 10 at 20:06
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    $\begingroup$ @Punintended: Ahah. At first I thought, "wait, it's also low Earth orbit in the opposite direction!". $\endgroup$ – Eric Duminil Jul 12 at 8:36

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