1
$\begingroup$

I've read about cryogenic storable liquid rocket engine but since it doesn't refer to its fuel, I want to understand the difference between a cryogenic and a cryo-storable engine. The term cryo-storable is found in the document Multidisciplinary design optimisation of Expendable Launch vehicles

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Can you provide links where you read about this? I am not sure what you are asking. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Aug 14 at 11:10
  • $\begingroup$ Well, I'm reading it in a thesis about launcher design, and I'm unable to find any similar literature, which is why I turned to Stack. I read that there are semi-cryo engines and storable propellant engines(some are toxic) but I didn't find the term much else. The thesis is called " Multidisciplinary design optimisation of Expendable Launch vehicles" by Francesco Castellini politesi.polimi.it/bitstream/10589/56841/1/… $\endgroup$ – Rajath Pai Aug 14 at 11:15
4
$\begingroup$

Based on page 31 of the document referenced in the question, the author appears to use the term for engines that use one cryo propellant and one storable one (for example, liquid oxygen and kerosene). It's not a term I have heard before.

Prop: integer variable defining the type of propellants used for new design rocket engines. The following alternatives are considered:

o Prop=1: liquid cryogenic engine, burning Liquid Hydrogen (LH 2 ) and Liquid Oxygen (LOx).

o Prop=2: liquid cryo-storable engine, burning Rocket Propellant One (RP1) and LOx.

o Prop=3: liquid storable engine, burning Mono-Metil Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (N 2 O 4 ).

o Prop=4: solid propellant engine with a fixed Ammonium Perclorate (AP), Hydroxyl-Terminated Poli Butadiene (HTPB) and Aluminium powder formulation.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Yes, I's suspected that he was referring to semi-cryogenic engines, but just wanted to know if this was a term he came up with, or is indeed out there and meant something different. I must have missed this somehow. Thanks anyway $\endgroup$ – Rajath Pai Aug 14 at 12:26
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You're welcome. Thanks for the link, I enjoyed looking through the document. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Aug 14 at 12:26
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I'm working on something similar, but far simpler, as I'm pursuing it as a Masters research project $\endgroup$ – Rajath Pai Aug 14 at 12:34
2
$\begingroup$

Cryogenic: the propellant has to be cooled to keep it in a liquid state. At room temperature, it's a gas. Oxygen, hydrogen for example. These propellants need careful handling because they are at very low temperatures.

Storable: the propellant is a liquid at room temperature, so the rocket can sit on the launch pad with propellants on board without needing to vent boiloff or refrigeration. Examples: RP-1, MMH, UDMH.
This is desirable, because it makes launch delays easier to handle. The drawback of most storable propellants is that they're toxic, so they need careful handling. Some of these propellants are hypergolic, i.e. they burn when they come in contact with each other.

Cryo-storable would then be a rocket that uses one cryogenic and one storable propellant (e.g. oxygen and RP-1).

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.