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Currently, I am developing a trajectory optimization tool for launch vehicle from lift-off to orbit using python for my project. Since I'm new to optimization problem, I am finding it hard to understand the different maneuvers in each phase of flights and how to program those maneuvers in different frames.

Can someone please give a clear idea about defining Equation of motions for different phases of flight with maneuvers and reference python code deals with similar problem.

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    $\begingroup$ You may have an easier time finding reference code in MATLAB $\endgroup$ Aug 20, 2019 at 7:04
  • $\begingroup$ Can you please specify some sources for them $\endgroup$
    – Astrolien
    Aug 22, 2019 at 17:35
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    $\begingroup$ I do it in GMAT (but I program liftoff and ascent phase myself (in the language very similar to MATLAB)). GMAT does all optimization work. It looks like You can find and see GMAT source codes (in C/C++). I'm not sure about Python. $\endgroup$ Aug 30, 2020 at 19:25
  • $\begingroup$ @PeterNazarenko How did you program maneuvers during the ascending phase in your code? GMAT source code has ascenting phase of launch vehicle? $\endgroup$
    – Astrolien
    Sep 4, 2020 at 16:53
  • $\begingroup$ @Astrolien No, GMAT doesn't calculate ascend phase itself. I do it manually in script by means of "while" or "for" statements. Something like this while ship.Earth.Altitude <= alt1 some stuff EndWhile; $\endgroup$ Sep 4, 2020 at 18:16

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The problem with such tools is that they may be considered a national security risk as the principles are similar to those of missiles.

However, there are excellent Master theses and PhD dissertations on the topic of optimal control for landing rockets, such as this MSc thesis and this SpaceX paper. These will explain the equations of motion and part of the derivation and problem solving methods. You will mostly likely have to write your own code.

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