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Besides those using LH2 in a booster and/or sustainer stage, that is.

EDIT: I should have made it clear that this applies to launch vehicles, not spacecrafts flying deep space mission.

EDIT: OK, I realized that there is the single case of Delta IV's lower stage LOX tank. And the SLS should also count too, but since it's derived from the STS ET, it got its design from reasons rather differently than most other rockets.

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  • $\begingroup$ Are you talking about insulation applied to the outside of the booster itself? Like the orange foam on the shuttle external tank (I know that doesn't count because it's LH2, but I am trying to understand your question.) $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Sep 16 '19 at 1:52
  • $\begingroup$ @OrganicMarble my take is that if insulation could be cited on a LOX tank, the question would be answered. Even better if some tank insulation could be cited for sub-cooled kerosene. In addition to slowing boiloff to a managable level, insulation can also slow the buildup of ice prelaunch. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Sep 16 '19 at 2:07
  • $\begingroup$ @OrganicMarble Yes, that's exactly what I wanted to ask. Also the space shuttle ET's LOX tank has insulation, but for reasons other than LOX boil-off (protection of the orbiter). $\endgroup$ – Meatball Princess Sep 16 '19 at 2:23
  • $\begingroup$ Cool, thanks for the clarification. $\endgroup$ – Organic Marble Sep 16 '19 at 2:52
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    $\begingroup$ Long march 2/3 uses foam insulation for the lower stage to keep the tank warm. I remember in a lot of videos, the right after ignition, most of the foam tiles would be shaken off the rocket. $\endgroup$ – user3528438 Sep 16 '19 at 4:50
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LH2 is not the only cryogenic propellant, LOX as an oxidizer is used for other propellants than hydrogen (typically hydrocarbons), and is cold enough to require shielding.

But most propellant would require some form of insulation if they were to stay in their tanks over time.

For an actual example, here's a diagram showing the thermal insulation around the propellant tanks of the Apollo LM descent stage, which used $N_2O_4$ + UDMH/MMH as propellant

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ I know the lander has this. However, my intention was to ask whether there is any insulation used on rockets themselves, not spacecraft. I don't know a lot about upper stages, but I guess just polishing the exterior gets 9/10 of the job done when it comes to protecting LOX. $\endgroup$ – Meatball Princess Sep 15 '19 at 9:11
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    $\begingroup$ I guess you are looking for launch vehicles then. The LM is clearly a rocket. $\endgroup$ – SE - stop firing the good guys Sep 15 '19 at 9:14
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    $\begingroup$ @Hohmannfan that's an interesting thought. Technically speaking, if that would be the case, then how is the LM not a launch vehicle as well? The descent stage propulsively landed on the surface from lunar orbit, and the ascent stage launched to orbit from the surface. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Sep 16 '19 at 2:03
  • $\begingroup$ @uhoh Let's say it's not an Earth-launch vehicle :D $\endgroup$ – BlueCoder Sep 16 '19 at 8:09
  • $\begingroup$ Any rocket using liquid cryogenic fuel like methane, ethane or propane? $\endgroup$ – Uwe Sep 16 '19 at 14:14

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