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bright spot The image above, one of a total of 21 images shot over a 4 minutes span, was captured by Curiosity on June 16,2019 or sol 2438 on Mars. Only in this image a bright spot shows up, while the next and previous images from the same scene, are captured only 13 sec. before and after.

Scientists from NASA chalked it up to reflections from distant rocks or glare caused by the Sun.

Just after the weekend when this series of images was shot, on sol 2440 it appeared that Curiosity's most recent transmission didn't come down as expected, so the rover was commanded to retransmit all the data from where it ended up after its drive that weekend.

So could the bright spot on the image have been caused by a data transmit or storage failure and could enlargement of the bright spot reveal this or the presence of a reflecting rock ?

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    $\begingroup$ Data transmission and storage are generally double checked with layers of checksums for integrity. I think most likely it really maybe data corruption at source i.e at CCD. Maybe cosmic ray or if I am allowed to make a wild guess the cell circuit controlling the integration time behaved funny due to some upset. $\endgroup$ – Prakhar Oct 9 at 14:11
  • $\begingroup$ @Prakhar Could not enlargement of the bright spot reveal that it is indeed a CCD malfunction ? $\endgroup$ – Conelisinspace Oct 9 at 15:36
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    $\begingroup$ Let us say it is not CCD problem then maybe it has to be some geological structure reflecting the light, it has to quite big structure(>100m?) due to distance, and the likelihood of such structure in middle of the flat/plain desert does not seem likely. Or could it that a local high speed whirl wind created a mirage like they do in earth ? $\endgroup$ – Prakhar Oct 9 at 15:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Prakhar Would a whirl wind look like that ? Do you have the capacity to enlarge the bright spot ? Then may be we could see the structure ? $\endgroup$ – Conelisinspace Oct 9 at 15:51
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    $\begingroup$ imgur.com/oHpmVUd. There you go $\endgroup$ – Prakhar Oct 9 at 16:41

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